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Associations between Green Building Design Strategies and Community Health Resilience to Extreme Heat Events: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

1
Biositu, LLC, Houston, TX 77006, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(4), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040663
Received: 2 January 2019 / Revised: 18 February 2019 / Accepted: 19 February 2019 / Published: 24 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Adaptation to Climate Change)
This project examined evidence linking green building design strategies with the potential to enhance community resilience to extreme heat events. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) method for a systematic review, it assessed the strength of the evidence supporting the potential for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) credit requirements to reduce the adverse effects of extreme heat events and/or enhance a building’s passive survivability (i.e., the ability to continue to function during utility outages) during those events. The PRISMA Flow Diagram resulted in the selection of 12 LEED for New Construction (LEED NC) credits for inclusion in the review. Following a preliminary scan of evidence supporting public health co-benefits of the LEED for Neighborhood Development rating system, queries were submitted in PubMed using National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings Terms. Queries identified links between LEED credit requirements and risk of exposure to extreme heat, environmental determinants of health, co-benefits to public health outcomes, and co-benefits to built environment outcomes. Public health co-benefits included reducing the risk of vulnerability to heat stress and reducing heat-related morbidity and mortality. The results lay the groundwork for collaboration across the public health, civil society, climate change, and green building sectors. View Full-Text
Keywords: heat-related hazards; sustainable design; climate change mitigation; climate change adaptation; sustainable communities heat-related hazards; sustainable design; climate change mitigation; climate change adaptation; sustainable communities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Houghton, A.; Castillo-Salgado, C. Associations between Green Building Design Strategies and Community Health Resilience to Extreme Heat Events: A Systematic Review of the Evidence. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 663. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040663

AMA Style

Houghton A, Castillo-Salgado C. Associations between Green Building Design Strategies and Community Health Resilience to Extreme Heat Events: A Systematic Review of the Evidence. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(4):663. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040663

Chicago/Turabian Style

Houghton, Adele; Castillo-Salgado, Carlos. 2019. "Associations between Green Building Design Strategies and Community Health Resilience to Extreme Heat Events: A Systematic Review of the Evidence" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 4: 663. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040663

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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