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Article

Extended-Family Talk about Sex and Teen Sexual Behavior

1
Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA
2
Lynch Research Associates, 1 South Avenue, Natick, MA 01760, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030480
Received: 12 December 2018 / Revised: 30 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teenage Reproductive Health)
Research shows that family communication about sexuality can protect against teens’ risky sexual behavior. However, few studies assess talk with extended family about sex or how this communication relates to teens’ sexual behavior. The current study includes cross-sectional survey data from 952 adolescents. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess associations between teens’ sexual risk behaviors and communication with extended family about protection methods, risks of sex and relational approaches to sex, defined as talk about sex within a close relationship. For sexually active teens, talk about protection methods was associated with fewer sexual partners and talk about risks of sex was associated with more sexual partners regardless of teen gender and the generation of extended family with whom teens talk. Results suggest that extended-family talk about sex may influence teens’ sexual behavior independent of effects of teen–parent communication. However, the direction of the effect depends on the content of the conversations. These findings suggest the need to explore whether and how extended family could be included in health prevention and intervention programs, because programs which include family largely focus on parents. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent reproductive health; family communication; extended family; teen sexual behavior adolescent reproductive health; family communication; extended family; teen sexual behavior
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MDPI and ACS Style

Grossman, J.M.; Lynch, A.D.; Richer, A.M.; DeSouza, L.M.; Ceder, I. Extended-Family Talk about Sex and Teen Sexual Behavior. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 480. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030480

AMA Style

Grossman JM, Lynch AD, Richer AM, DeSouza LM, Ceder I. Extended-Family Talk about Sex and Teen Sexual Behavior. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(3):480. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030480

Chicago/Turabian Style

Grossman, Jennifer M., Alicia D. Lynch, Amanda M. Richer, Lisette M. DeSouza, and Ineke Ceder. 2019. "Extended-Family Talk about Sex and Teen Sexual Behavior" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 3: 480. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030480

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