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Open AccessArticle

Exposure Characterization of Haloacetic Acids in Humans for Exposure and Risk Assessment Applications: An Exploratory Study

1
Department of Environmental Health Science, Indiana University Fairbanks School of Public Health, 1050 Wishard Boulevard, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
2
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter St., Columbia, SC 29208, USA
3
Currently at the Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 471; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030471
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
Disinfected water is the major source of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in humans, but their inter- and intra-individual variability for exposure and risk assessment applications is under-researched. Thus, we measured HAAs in cross-sectional and longitudinal urine and water specimens from 17 individuals. Five regulated HAAs—mono-, di-, and trichloroacetic acid (MCAA, DCAA, and TCAA) and mono- and dibromoacetic acid (MBAA and DBAA)—and one unregulated HAA—bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA)—were measured. Urinary DCAA, MBAA, DBAA, and BCAA levels were always below the limits of detection (LOD). Measured levels and interindividual variability of urinary MCAA were higher than urinary TCAA. Longitudinal urinary specimens showed MCAA levels peaked in after-shower specimens, while TCAA levels remain unchanged. Correlation between urinary MCAA and TCAA was moderate but statistically significant. The prevalence of MCAA and TCAA in urine suggest they can be considered as biomarkers of HAA. Peak urinary MCAA in post-shower specimens suggest MCAA captures short-term exposure via dermal and/or inhalation, while urinary TCAA captures long-term exposure via ingestion. However, further research is warranted in a large pool of participants to test the reliability of MCAA as exposure biomarker. View Full-Text
Keywords: disinfectant byproducts; haloacetic acids; monochloroacetic acid; trichloroacetic acid; exposure assessment; risk assessment of haloacetic acids; pregnancy outcomes disinfectant byproducts; haloacetic acids; monochloroacetic acid; trichloroacetic acid; exposure assessment; risk assessment of haloacetic acids; pregnancy outcomes
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Parvez, S.; Ashby, J.L.; Kimura, S.Y.; Richardson, S.D. Exposure Characterization of Haloacetic Acids in Humans for Exposure and Risk Assessment Applications: An Exploratory Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 471.

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