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Open AccessReview

Persistent Organic Pollutant-Mediated Insulin Resistance

1
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan 49201, Korea
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Changwon 51472, Korea
3
Institute of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52727, Korea
4
Department of Convergence Medical Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52727, Korea
5
Department of Rheumatology, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan 49201, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 448; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030448
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 3 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrine Disruptors Exposure on Human Health)
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) have become wide-spread environmental contaminants as a consequence of their extensive use, long-range transport, and persistence. Because POPs are highly resistant to metabolic degradation, humans bioaccumulate these lipophilic and hydrophobic pollutants in fatty tissues for many years. Previous studies have demonstrated that POPs including PCBs are involved in the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 and insulin resistance. Numerous epidemiological studies suggest an association between POP burden and DM type 2/metabolic syndrome. In addition, several experimental studies have provided additional evidence supporting the association between POP exposure and DM type 2 or insulin resistance. Epidemiological and experimental studies have provided compelling evidence indicating that exposure to POPs increases the risk of developing insulin resistance and metabolic disorders. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying POP-induced insulin resistance is yet to be elucidated. In this article, we review literature that has reported on the association between POP burden and insulin resistance and the mechanism underlying POP-induced insulin resistance, and discuss implications for public health. View Full-Text
Keywords: insulin resistance; persistent organic pollutants insulin resistance; persistent organic pollutants
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, Y.A.; Park, J.B.; Woo, M.S.; Lee, S.Y.; Kim, H.Y.; Yoo, Y.H. Persistent Organic Pollutant-Mediated Insulin Resistance. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 448. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030448

AMA Style

Kim YA, Park JB, Woo MS, Lee SY, Kim HY, Yoo YH. Persistent Organic Pollutant-Mediated Insulin Resistance. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(3):448. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030448

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Yeon A.; Park, Joon B.; Woo, Min S.; Lee, Sang Y.; Kim, Hye Y.; Yoo, Young H. 2019. "Persistent Organic Pollutant-Mediated Insulin Resistance" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 3: 448. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030448

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