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Open AccessArticle

Community Stakeholders’ Perspectives on Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy—A Qualitative Study from Ethiopia

1
College of Health Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma 1355, Ethiopia
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway
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Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
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Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Science and Technology, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway
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Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Olav’s Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, 7030 Trondheim, Norway
6
Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4694; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234694
Received: 5 November 2019 / Revised: 16 November 2019 / Accepted: 17 November 2019 / Published: 25 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women's Reproductive and Maternal Health)
Intimate partner violence (IPV) in pregnancy adversely affects the health of women and unborn children. To prevent this, the community responses, societal systems, and structures to support victims of IPV in pregnancy are vital. Objectives: to explore community stakeholders’ perspectives related to IPV in pregnancy in Jimma, Ethiopia, and if needed, create the knowledge base for interventions. Methods: using an exploratory design, this qualitative study had a maximum-variation (multiple spectrum sources) sampling strategy with 16 semi-structured interviews of purposively selected key informants representing different community institutions. Guided by Connell’s theory of gender and power, a content analysis of the translated interviews was conducted using Atlas.ti 7 software. Results: reconciliation between IPV victims and their abusers was the solution promoted by almost all the respondents. There was limited awareness of the adverse impacts IPV in pregnancy has on the health of the woman and the foetus. Despite regular encounters with victims, there is no organized or structured operational response to support IPV victims between the participating institutions. Conclusion: the potential danger of IPV for the mother or the unborn child was not well understood by the members of the studied Ethiopian community. Neither coordinated efforts to support IPV victims nor links among relevant agencies existed. The study demonstrated the dire need of coordinated practical action, changes in current socio-cultural norms, formal training and capacity building, awareness creation, clear intervention guidelines, and facilitation of support networks among relevant institutions in Ethiopian communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: IPV in pregnancy; responses; gender and power; capacity building; support and networking; Ethiopia IPV in pregnancy; responses; gender and power; capacity building; support and networking; Ethiopia
MDPI and ACS Style

Gashaw, B.T.; Magnus, J.H.; Schei, B.; Solbraekke, K.N. Community Stakeholders’ Perspectives on Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy—A Qualitative Study from Ethiopia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4694.

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