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Open AccessArticle

Can Heart Rate Variability Determine Recovery Following Distinct Strength Loadings? A Randomized Cross-Over Trial

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Department of Molecular and Cellular Sports Medicine, German Sport University, 50933 Cologne, Germany
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Portugal Football School, Portuguese Football Federation, 1495-433 Oeiras, Portugal
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Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, CIDESD, University Institute of Maia, ISMAI, 4475-690 Maia, Portugal
4
College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville 4811, Australia
5
Firstbeat Technologies, 40100 Jyväskylä, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4353; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224353
Received: 13 October 2019 / Revised: 3 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 7 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Exercise and Sports Performance)
This study aimed to compare the acute effects of hypertrophic (HYP) and maximum strength (MAX) loadings on heart rate variability (HRV) and to compare possible loading-specific alterations with other markers of recovery. Ten young men with strength training experience performed two leg press loadings (HYP: five times 10 repetitions at 70% of one repetition maximum (1RM) with 2 minutes inter-set rest; MAX: 15 times one repetition at 100% of 1RM with 3 minutes inter-set rest) in a randomized order. The root mean square of successive differences statistically decreased after both protocols (HYP: 65.7 ± 26.6 ms to 23.9 ± 18.7 ms, p = 0.026; MAX: 77.7 ± 37.0 ms to 55.3 ± 22.3 ms, p = 0.049), while the frequency domains of HRV remained statistically unaltered. The low frequency (LF) band statistically increased at 48h post-MAX only (p = 0.033). Maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) statistically decreased after HYP (p = 0.026) and returned to baseline after 24h of recovery. Creatine kinase (CK) statistically increased above baseline at 1h post-loadings (HYP p = 0.028; MAX p = 0.020), returning to baseline at 24h post. Our findings indicate no distinct associations between changes in HRV and MVC or CK. View Full-Text
Keywords: fatigue; recovery; MVC; HRV; RMSSD; strength performance fatigue; recovery; MVC; HRV; RMSSD; strength performance
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Thamm, A.; Freitag, N.; Figueiredo, P.; Doma, K.; Rottensteiner, C.; Bloch, W.; Schumann, M. Can Heart Rate Variability Determine Recovery Following Distinct Strength Loadings? A Randomized Cross-Over Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4353.

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