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The Association between Social Support Sources and Cognitive Function among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A One-Year Prospective Study

1
Department of Social Science, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi 474-8511, Japan
2
Department of Public Health, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Aichi 467-8601, Japan
3
Department of Health Sciences, Shinshu University Graduate School, Nagano 390-8621, Japan
4
Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Aichi 461-8673, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4228; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214228
Received: 10 September 2019 / Revised: 30 October 2019 / Accepted: 30 October 2019 / Published: 31 October 2019
There is evidence that social relationships may modify cognitive decline in older people. We examined the prospective association between social support and cognitive function among community-dwelling older people. Japanese adults recruited at health checkups in suburban towns were surveyed at baseline and one-year follow-up. Cognitive function was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Japanese version (MoCA-J). Social support from coresiding family, non-coresiding family, and neighbors/friends was assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Multivariable linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the effects of social support on MoCA-J scores at follow-up. Data were analyzed from 121 older people (mean age (standard deviation): 73.86 (4.95) years). There was a positive association between social support exchanges with neighbors and friends and MoCA-J scores at follow-up after covariate adjustment (unstandardized β = 1.23, p = 0.006). Social support exchanges with coresiding family and non-coresiding family and relatives were not associated with MoCA-J scores at follow-up (coresiding family: Unstandardized β = 0.28, p = 0.813, non-coresiding family and relatives: Unstandardized β = 0.51, p = 0.238). The provision of emotional support to neighbors and friends had the largest effect on MoCA-J scores. Our findings suggest that social support exchanges with neighbors and friends are protective against cognitive decline. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive function; community-dwelling older adults; prospective study; social support; Japanese cognitive function; community-dwelling older adults; prospective study; social support; Japanese
MDPI and ACS Style

Noguchi, T.; Nojima, I.; Inoue-Hirakawa, T.; Sugiura, H. The Association between Social Support Sources and Cognitive Function among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A One-Year Prospective Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4228.

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