Next Article in Journal
Importance of Social- and Health-Related Problems: Do Spaniards Give Them the Significance They Actually Deserve?
Next Article in Special Issue
The Impact of Liquor Restrictions on Serious Assaults across Queensland, Australia
Previous Article in Journal
Stratified Diabetes Mellitus Prevalence for the Northwestern Nigerian States, a Data Mining Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
“Everyone Has the Right to Drink Beer”: A Stakeholder Analysis of Challenges to Youth Alcohol Harm-Reduction Policies in Lebanon
Open AccessArticle

Recruiting the “Heavy-Using Loyalists of Tomorrow”: An Analysis of the Aims, Effects and Mechanisms of Alcohol Advertising, Based on Advertising Industry Evaluations

1
Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1H 9SH, UK
2
Division of Health Policy and Systems, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, Health Sciences Faculty, University of Cape Town, Anzio Rd, Observatory, Cape Town 7925, South Africa
3
Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport, Institute for Social Marketing, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
4
SPECTRUM Consortium, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9YL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4092; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214092
Received: 31 August 2019 / Revised: 9 October 2019 / Accepted: 10 October 2019 / Published: 24 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Policy and Public Health)
Restricting alcohol advertising and marketing is a cost-effective intervention for reducing alcohol harms. However, the alcohol industry maintains that advertising does not affect consumption, claiming that its purpose is to help consumers choose brands, it is not aimed at young people, it only promotes “responsible consumption”, and any relationships with consumption are not causal. We reviewed 39 case studies (1981–2016) published by the advertising industry, which evaluate the effects of alcohol advertising campaigns. We used these to examine these industry claims. 30/39 (77%) of the case studies mentioned increasing/maintaining market share as an objective, or used this to assess the effectiveness of advertising campaigns. Most (25/39, 64%) found that campaigns increased consumption-related outcomes. Some campaigns targeted women, and heavy drinkers (e.g., Stella Artois lager, Famous Grouse whisky). Campaigns often (13/39, 33%) targeted younger drinkers. These data show that advertising does influence market share. Other effects reported in the case studies include changing the consumer profile towards: younger drinkers, women, new/lapsed drinkers, and heavy drinkers. They also present evidence of a causal relationship between advertising and consumption. In conclusion, this analysis, based on industry data, presents significant new evidence on (i) the effects of alcohol advertising on consumption-related outcomes, and (ii) the mechanisms by which it achieves those effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: advertising; marketing; alcohol; public health; commercial determinants of health advertising; marketing; alcohol; public health; commercial determinants of health
MDPI and ACS Style

Maani Hessari, N.; Bertscher, A.; Critchlow, N.; Fitzgerald, N.; Knai, C.; Stead, M.; Petticrew, M. Recruiting the “Heavy-Using Loyalists of Tomorrow”: An Analysis of the Aims, Effects and Mechanisms of Alcohol Advertising, Based on Advertising Industry Evaluations. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4092.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop