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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Resistant Starch Ingestion on Postprandial Lipemia and Subjective Appetite in Overweight or Obese Subjects

1
Centro de Investigación, División Académica de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco (UJAT), Villahermosa, Tabasco 86150, Mexico
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División Académica Multidisciplinaria de Comalcalco, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Comalcalco, Tabasco 86650, Mexico
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División Académica de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco. Villahermosa, Tabasco 86150, Mexico
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Unidad de Medicina Familiar No. 39, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Villahermosa, Tabasco 86070, Mexico
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División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. de México 04510, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3827; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203827
Received: 4 September 2019 / Revised: 7 October 2019 / Accepted: 9 October 2019 / Published: 11 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
Reports surrounding the role of resistant starch (RS) on postprandial lipemia in humans are scarce. The aim of the present study is to examine the effects of resistant starch on the postprandial lipemic response, subjective measures of appetite, and energy intake in overweight and obese subjects. In a randomized, single-blind, crossover study, 14 overweight/obese participants ate a high-fat breakfast (679 kcal, 58% from fat) and a supplement with native banana starch (NBS), high-amylose maize starch (HMS), or digestible maize starch (DMS) on three separate occasions. All supplements provided were matched by the available carbohydrate content, and the RS quantity in NBS and HMS supplements was identical. Appetite was estimated using visual analogue scale (VAS) and an ad libitum test meal. Postprandial glycemia, triglycerides, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and insulin excursions did not differ between treatments. Subjective appetite measures of satiety were significantly increased after HMS; however, no effects on energy intake were observed during the ad libitum test meal. These findings suggest that a single acute dose of RS cannot be expected to improve postprandial lipemia in subjects with overweight or obesity on a high-fat meal. However, the potential benefits of long-term supplementation should not be ruled out based on these results. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigestible carbohydrates; resistant starch; postprandial lipemia; appetite; triglycerides indigestible carbohydrates; resistant starch; postprandial lipemia; appetite; triglycerides
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García-Vázquez, C.; Ble-Castillo, J.L.; Arias-Córdova, Y.; Córdova-Uscanga, R.; Tovilla-Zárate, C.A.; Juárez-Rojop, I.E.; Olvera-Hernández, V.; Alvarez-Villagomez, C.S.; Nolasco-Coleman, A.M.; Díaz-Zagoya, J.C. Effects of Resistant Starch Ingestion on Postprandial Lipemia and Subjective Appetite in Overweight or Obese Subjects. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3827.

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