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Leg Dominance as a Risk Factor for Lower-Limb Injuries in Downhill Skiers—A Pilot Study into Possible Mechanisms
Open AccessArticle

Injury-Related Behavioral Variables in Alpine Skiers, Snowboarders, and Ski Tourers—A Matched and Enlarged Re-Analysis

Department of Sport Science, University of Innsbruck, Fürstenweg 185, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3807; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203807
Received: 17 September 2019 / Revised: 8 October 2019 / Accepted: 9 October 2019 / Published: 10 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mountain Sports Activities: Injuries and Prevention)
Behavioral variables might play an important role in explaining the differences in injury rates across winter sport disciplines and injury prevention programs might be more specifically designed based on this knowledge. On ski slopes, alpine skiing, snowboarding, and ski touring are the predominant winter sport disciplines. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in injury-related behavioral variables between practitioners of these disciplines. Using a matched re-analysis approach of a cross-sectional survey, 414 winter sport participants (alpine skiers, snowboarders, ski tourers, each n = 138) were analyzed on the differences in sensation seeking, treated injuries, and injury-related behavioral variables. Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel and Friedman tests revealed significantly higher sensation seeking, p < 0.001, and a significantly higher percentage of participants reporting to have consumed alcohol in the past five skiing days, p = 0.006, in snowboarders compared to alpine skiers. The participants with treated injuries showed higher sensation seeking, p < 0.050, and a higher percentage of snowboarders, p = 0.020, compared to participants without treated injuries. Injury prevention programs for snowboarders, who remain an important risk group for injury prevention, might benefit from considering a possibly higher percentage of alcohol-consuming participants and from providing information on injury-related risks of sensation seeking. View Full-Text
Keywords: sensation seeking; alpine skiing; ski touring; snowboarding sensation seeking; alpine skiing; ski touring; snowboarding
MDPI and ACS Style

Niedermeier, M.; Ruedl, G.; Burtscher, M.; Kopp, M. Injury-Related Behavioral Variables in Alpine Skiers, Snowboarders, and Ski Tourers—A Matched and Enlarged Re-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3807.

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