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Open AccessArticle

Bacterial Community Shifts Driven by Nitrogen Pollution in River Sediments of a Highly Urbanized City

1
Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Matter Cycles, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai 519082, China
2
School of Geographic Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China
3
Southern Laboratory of Ocean Science and Engineering (Guangdong, Zhuhai), Zhuhai 519000, China
4
The University of Texas at Austin Marine Science Institute, 750 Channel View Drive, Port Aransas, TX 78373, USA
5
Key Laboratory for Humid Subtropical Eco-geographical Processes of the Ministry of Education & School of Geographical Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3794; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203794
Received: 3 September 2019 / Revised: 27 September 2019 / Accepted: 2 October 2019 / Published: 9 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
Effects of nitrogen pollution on bacterial community shifts in river sediments remain barely understood. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities in sediments of urban and suburban rivers in a highly urbanized city, Shanghai. Sediment nitrate (NO3) and ammonia (NH4+) were highly accumulated in urban river. Operation Taxonomic Units (OTUs), Abundance-based Coverage Estimators (ACEs) and Chao 1 estimator in urban rivers were slightly lower than those in suburban rivers, while Shannon and Simpson indices were higher in urban rivers than those in suburban rivers. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant bacterial phylum communities, accounting for 68.5–84.9% of all communities. In particular, the relative abundances of Firmicutes and Nitrospirae were significantly higher in suburban rivers than in urban rivers, while relative abundances of Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Spirochaetes were significantly lower in suburban rivers than in urban rivers. NH4+ was significantly and negatively correlated with abundances of Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, and Actinobacteria. Importantly, the significant and negative effects of sediment NH4+ on bacterial richness and diversity suggested that nitrogen pollution likely contribute to the decrease in the bacterial richness and diversity. The results highlight that nitrogen enrichment could drive the shifts of bacterial abundance and diversity in the urban river sediments where are strongly influenced by human activities under the rapid urbanization stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacterial community; nitrogen pollution; river sediment; urbanization bacterial community; nitrogen pollution; river sediment; urbanization
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Lin, X.; Gao, D.; Lu, K.; Li, X. Bacterial Community Shifts Driven by Nitrogen Pollution in River Sediments of a Highly Urbanized City. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3794.

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