Next Article in Journal
Social Capital Associated with Quality of Life among People Living with HIV/AIDS in Nanchang, China
Previous Article in Journal
The Effect of Prenatal Stress, Proxied by Marital and Paternity Status, on the Risk of Preterm Birth
Previous Article in Special Issue
Joint Risk of Rainfall and Storm Surges during Typhoons in a Coastal City of Haidian Island, China
Article Menu
Issue 2 (January-2) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020275

Root and Shoot Biomass Growth of Constructed Floating Wetlands Plants in Saline Environments

1
Stormwater Research Group, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sunshine Coast, QLD 4558, Australia
2
IMT Atlantique, Process Engineering for Environment and Food, Université Bretagne Loire, F-44307 Nantes, France
3
Covey Associates Pty Ltd., Maroochydore, QLD 4558, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 16 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stormwater Management in Urban Areas)
Full-Text   |   PDF [2753 KB, uploaded 18 January 2019]   |  

Abstract

Constructed Floating Wetlands (CFWs) are increasingly being used globally in freshwater environments such as urban lakes and ponds to remove pollutants from urban stormwater runoff. However, to date there has been limited research into the use and performance of these systems in saline environments. This study compared the root and shoot biomass growth and nutrient uptake of five different plant species, Chrysopogon zizanioides, Baumea juncea, Isolepis nodosa, Phragmites australis and Sarcocornia quinqueflora, in three different saltwater treatments over a 12-week period. The aim of the study was to identify which of the plant species may be most suitable for use in CFWs in saline environments. Plant nutrient uptake testing revealed that Phragmites australis had the greatest percentage increase (1473–2477%) of Nitrogen mass in the shoots in all treatments. Sarcocornia quinqueflora also had impressive Nitrogen mass increase in saltwater showing an increase of 966% (0.208 ± 0.134 g). This suggests that the use of Phragmites australis and Sarcocornia quinqueflora plants in CFWs installed in saline water bodies, with regular harvesting of the shoot mass, may significantly reduce Nitrogen concentrations in the water. Isolepis nodosa had the greatest percentage increase (112% or 0.018 ± 0.020 g) of Phosphorous mass in the shoots in the saltwater treatment. Baumea juncea had the greatest percentage increase (315% or 0.026 ± 0.012 g) of Phosphorous mass in the roots in the saltwater treatment. This suggests that the use of Isolepis nodosa and Baumea juncea plants in CFWs installed in saline water bodies may significantly reduce Phosphorous concentrations in the water if there was a way to harvest both the shoots above and the roots below the CFWs. The study is continuing, and it is anticipated that more information will be available on CFW plants installed in saline environments in the near future. View Full-Text
Keywords: constructed floating wetlands; stormwater pollution; plant biomass constructed floating wetlands; stormwater pollution; plant biomass
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sanicola, O.; Lucke, T.; Stewart, M.; Tondera, K.; Walker, C. Root and Shoot Biomass Growth of Constructed Floating Wetlands Plants in Saline Environments. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 275.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top