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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020230

Trust in the Work Environment and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Findings from the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index

1
Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, (MS-R17), 1090 Tusculum Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA
2
UI Healthier Workforce Center, The University of Iowa, UI Research Park, IREH #106, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 7 January 2019 / Accepted: 9 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Total Worker Health to Advance Worker Health and Safety)
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Abstract

This study examined associations between trust, an important aspect of workplace social capital, with seven cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (American Heart Association Life’s Simple 7 (LS7)): smoking, obesity, low physical activity, poor diet, diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. Data are from the U.S. Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index (2010–2012), a nationally representative telephone survey of U.S. workers (n = 412,884). The independent variable was the response to a work environment (WE) question as to whether their supervisor always creates an open and trusting environment. Regression models were adjusted for demographic characteristics with each of the LS7 CVD risk factors as dependent variables. Twenty-one percent of workers reported that their supervisor did not create an open and trusting environment. Trust was associated with increased adjusted odds of having many of the LS7 CVD risk factors. Among those workers whose supervisor created a mistrustful environment, the odds ratios were greatest (>20%) for having four or more of the LS7 CVD risk factors. View Full-Text
Keywords: cardiovascular disease; work environment; social capital; trust; Total Worker Health®; health behaviors; job stress cardiovascular disease; work environment; social capital; trust; Total Worker Health®; health behaviors; job stress
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Alterman, T.; Tsai, R.; Ju, J.; Kelly, K.M. Trust in the Work Environment and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Findings from the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 230.

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