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Open AccessArticle

Employee Stress, Reduced Productivity, and Interest in a Workplace Health Program: A Case Study from the Australian Mining Industry

Wesley Medical Research, Brisbane, QLD 4066, Australia
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010094
Received: 15 October 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 23 December 2018 / Published: 31 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Total Worker Health to Advance Worker Health and Safety)
The Australian mining sector has an elevated industry prevalence of stress and high stress related productivity impairment costs. This study surveyed 897 employees from an Australian mining company to identify characteristics associated with: (a) high stress related productivity impairment costs; and (b) likelihood of stressed employees wanting stress management assistance at work. Groups associated with average annual productivity impairment costs in excess of $50,000 per employee included: permanent day shift employees; employees who reported being stressed at work most of the time; employees who reported being stress at work all of the time; and employees who were contemplating better managing their stress in the next 6 months. Overall, 52% of employees who identified as being in the contemplation stage of change for stress management and 52% of employees who experienced stress most of the time reported wanting stress assistance with stress. However, only 33% of stressed permanent day shift employees and 36% of employees who experienced stress all the time reported wanting stress assistance. To achieve a high return on investment when implementing workplace stress management programs in the mining industry, practitioners need to strategically target health promotion to engage stressed employees with high productivity impairment costs and low desire for stress management assistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: work stress; productivity; impairment cost; stress management; employee characteristics; workplace health promotion; health and safety work stress; productivity; impairment cost; stress management; employee characteristics; workplace health promotion; health and safety
MDPI and ACS Style

Street, T.D.; Lacey, S.J.; Somoray, K. Employee Stress, Reduced Productivity, and Interest in a Workplace Health Program: A Case Study from the Australian Mining Industry. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 94.

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