Next Article in Journal
Predictors of Health-Seeking Behavior for Fever Cases among Caregivers of Under-Five Children in Malaria-Endemic Area of Imo State, Nigeria
Previous Article in Journal
Feasibility Study of a Menstrual Hygiene Management Intervention for People with Intellectual Impairments and Their Carers in Nepal
Open AccessArticle

The Gut-Microbiome in Gulf War Veterans: A Preliminary Report

1
Environmental Health Department, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
2
Environmental Health and Disease Laboratory, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
3
Biostatistics and Epidemiology Data Analytics Center, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
4
Biostatistics Department, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
5
Department of Clinical Immunology, Nova Southeastern University, 3200 South University Drive, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328, USA
6
Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine Peoria, Peoria, IL 61605, USA
7
Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Denotes co-last authors.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3751; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193751
Received: 6 September 2019 / Revised: 17 September 2019 / Accepted: 1 October 2019 / Published: 4 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gulf War Illness, A Drug and Environmentally-TriggeredCondition)
Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a chronic multi-symptom disorder affecting the central nervous system (CNS), immune and gastrointestinal (GI) systems of Gulf War veterans (GWV). We assessed the relationships between GWI, GI symptoms, gut microbiome and inflammatory markers in GWV from the Boston Gulf War Illness Consortium (GWIC). Three groups of GWIC veterans were recruited in this pilot study; GWV without GWI and no gastrointestinal symptoms (controls), GWV with GWI and no gastrointestinal symptoms (GWI-GI), GWV with GWI who reported gastrointestinal symptoms (GW+GI). Here we report on a subset of the first thirteen stool samples analyzed. Results showed significantly different gut microbiome patterns among the three groups and within the GWI +/−GI groups. Specifically, GW controls had a greater abundance of firmicutes and the GWI+GI group had a greater abundance of the phyla bacteroidetes, actinobacteria, euryarchaeota, and proteobacteria as well as higher abundances of the families Bacteroidaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, and Bifidobacteriaceae. The GWI+GI group also showed greater plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-RI and they endorsed significantly more chemical weapons exposure during the war and reported significantly greater chronic pain, fatigue and sleep difficulties than the other groups. Studies with larger samples sizes are needed to confirm these initial findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: Gulf War illness; microbiome; Gulf War; veterans; inflammation; cytokines; exposure Gulf War illness; microbiome; Gulf War; veterans; inflammation; cytokines; exposure
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Janulewicz, P.A.; Seth, R.K.; Carlson, J.M.; Ajama, J.; Quinn, E.; Heeren, T.; Klimas, N.; Lasley, S.M.; Horner, R.D.; Sullivan, K.; Chatterjee, S. The Gut-Microbiome in Gulf War Veterans: A Preliminary Report. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3751.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop