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Open AccessArticle

Spatial Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements in Surface Soils of Bosten Lake Basin, Central Asia

by 1,2,3,*, 1,2,3 and 1,2,3
1
State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, China
2
Research Center for Ecology and Environment of Central Asia, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, China
3
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3741; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193741
Received: 22 August 2019 / Revised: 30 September 2019 / Accepted: 1 October 2019 / Published: 4 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Environmental Risk Assessment)
A geographically weighted regression and classical linear model were applied to quantitatively reveal the factors influencing the spatial distribution of potentially toxic elements of forty-eight surface soils from Bosten Lake basin in Central Asia. At the basin scale, the spatial distribution of the majority of potentially toxic elements, including: cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thallium (Tl), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn), had been significantly influenced by the geochemical characteristics of the soil parent material. However, the arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), antimony (Sb), and mercury (Hg) have been influenced by the total organic matter in soils. Compared with the results of the classical linear model, the geographically weighted regression can significantly increase the level of simulation at the basin spatial scale. The fitting coefficients of the predicted values and the actual measured values significantly increased from the classical linear model (Hg: r2 = 0.31; Sb: r2 = 0.64; Cd: r2 = 0.81; and As: r2 = 0.68) to the geographically weighted regression (Hg: r2 = 0.56; Sb: r2 = 0.74; Cd: r2 = 0.89; and As: r2 = 0.85). Based on the results of the geographically weighted regression, the average values of the total organic matter for As (28.7%), Cd (39.2%), Hg (46.5%), and Sb (26.6%) were higher than those for the other potentially toxic elements: Cr (0.1%), Co (4.0%), Ni (5.3%), V (0.7%), Cu (18.0%), Pb (7.8%), Tl (14.4%), and Zn (21.4%). There were no significant non-carcinogenic risks to human health, however, the results suggested that the spatial distribution of potentially toxic elements had significant differences. View Full-Text
Keywords: arid land; classical linear model; geographically weighted regression; influencing factors; soil geochemistry arid land; classical linear model; geographically weighted regression; influencing factors; soil geochemistry
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ma, L.; Abuduwaili, J.; Liu, W. Spatial Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements in Surface Soils of Bosten Lake Basin, Central Asia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3741. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193741

AMA Style

Ma L, Abuduwaili J, Liu W. Spatial Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements in Surface Soils of Bosten Lake Basin, Central Asia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(19):3741. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193741

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ma, Long; Abuduwaili, Jilili; Liu, Wen. 2019. "Spatial Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements in Surface Soils of Bosten Lake Basin, Central Asia" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 19: 3741. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193741

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