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Open AccessArticle

A Study of Perceived Nature, Shade and Trees and Self-Reported Physical Activity in Denver

Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3604; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193604
Received: 19 August 2019 / Accepted: 20 September 2019 / Published: 26 September 2019
(1) Background: Current evidence on the association between greenery and physical activity (PA) remains inconsistent. Most studies on this association use objective measures of greenness, which do not reveal people’s perceptions of greenness in neighborhoods, or the role of quality components of greenness, such as shade, trees, and the presence of nature on this association. (2) Methods: Drawing on data from the Neighborhood Environment and Health Survey—a cross-sectional population-based survey of Denver residents in 2007—we examined which measures of greenness (perceived and objective) correlated with the self-reported PA. We also assessed how components of perceived greenness, shade, trees and the presence of nature, correlated with PA. (3) Results: Perceived greenness, reflecting perception of trees, shade and the presence of nature, was positively associated with reported moderate–vigorous PA. Conclusion: Findings provide evidence that quality aspects of greenness affect people’s perception of the neighborhood in a way that relates to PA. The individual contributions of shade, trees, and the presence of nature in this association should be analyzed in future studies. Understanding the link between shade and trees and PA has implications for how to plan for walkability and sun safety at the neighborhood scale. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; perceived greenness; shade; trees; objective greenness physical activity; perceived greenness; shade; trees; objective greenness
MDPI and ACS Style

Tabatabaie, S.; Litt, J.S.; Carrico, A. A Study of Perceived Nature, Shade and Trees and Self-Reported Physical Activity in Denver. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3604.

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