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Article

Relationship between Sleep Bruxism, Perceived Stress, and Coping Strategies

Department of General Dentistry, Medical University of Lodz, 251 Pomorska St., 92-213 Lodz, Poland
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3193; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173193
Received: 4 August 2019 / Revised: 20 August 2019 / Accepted: 26 August 2019 / Published: 1 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Diseases and Public Health)
Sleep bruxism (SB) is a common phenomenon defined as a masticatory muscle activity during sleep. Untreated severe SB can have significant dental and orofacial consequences. SB has often been linked with stress and maladaptive coping strategies. Therefore, in this study, a potential correlation between SB, perceived stress and coping strategies was evaluated. A total of 60 adults were enrolled into this study. Participants underwent a detailed intra- and extraoral exam focused on detecting bruxism symptoms. Additionally, the overnight Bruxism Index was recorded using the Bruxoff device. A total of 35 participants with symptoms of bruxism were assigned to the study group, whereas 25 asymptomatic participants were assigned to the control group. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was used for stress assessment and Brief-COPE for coping strategies. Results showed that the higher the PSS-10 score, the higher the Bruxism Index was in the study group. Positive coping strategies were chosen most frequently in the control group, while maladaptive ones were chosen in the study group. It can be concluded that there is a relationship between perceived stress and sleep bruxism. Moreover, the type of coping strategies used by participants may have an impact on sleep bruxism, but the relationship should be further investigated. View Full-Text
Keywords: sleep bruxism; perceived stress; coping strategies sleep bruxism; perceived stress; coping strategies
MDPI and ACS Style

Saczuk, K.; Lapinska, B.; Wilmont, P.; Pawlak, L.; Lukomska-Szymanska, M. Relationship between Sleep Bruxism, Perceived Stress, and Coping Strategies. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3193. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173193

AMA Style

Saczuk K, Lapinska B, Wilmont P, Pawlak L, Lukomska-Szymanska M. Relationship between Sleep Bruxism, Perceived Stress, and Coping Strategies. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(17):3193. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173193

Chicago/Turabian Style

Saczuk, Klara, Barbara Lapinska, Paulina Wilmont, Lukasz Pawlak, and Monika Lukomska-Szymanska. 2019. "Relationship between Sleep Bruxism, Perceived Stress, and Coping Strategies" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 17: 3193. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173193

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