Next Article in Journal
The Relationship between Functional Health Literacy, Self-Rated Health, and Social Support between Younger and Older Adults in Ghana
Previous Article in Journal
Results of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial to Promote the Use of Respiratory Protective Equipment among Migrant Workers Exposed to Organic Solvents in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises
Open AccessArticle

The Association between Eating-Out Rate and BMI in Korea

by Hwi Jun Kim 1,2, So Yeon Oh 1,2, Dong-Woo Choi 1,2 and Eun-Cheol Park 2,3,*
1
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
2
Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3186; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173186
Received: 11 July 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 31 August 2019
Previous research suggests that adult men consume larger amounts of calories while eating-out than when eating meals prepared at home. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association between the daily eating-out rate and body mass index (BMI) in the Korean population. The study used data from 18,019 individuals aged ≥19 years who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2013 to 2016. BMI was measured according to the Asia-Pacific BMI measurement criteria. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the validity of the association between the eating-out rate and BMI. In this population, women with higher eating-out rates were found to have higher BMIs. Specifically, the risks of becoming obese or overweight increased among those with a 1%–50% (obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09–1.51; overweight OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.14–1.64) or 51%–100% daily eating-out rate (obesity OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.24–1.84; overweight OR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.20–1.87), relative to those who reported never eating-out. By contrast, no statistically significant association between the daily eating-out rate and BMI was observed among men. Notably, we observed positive associations of the daily eating-out rate with obesity and being overweight in South Korean women, but not men. Our findings suggest that education about proper habits when eating-out is needed to prevent obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: BMI; obesity; overweight; eating-out rate; Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey BMI; obesity; overweight; eating-out rate; Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, H.J.; Oh, S.Y.; Choi, D.-W.; Park, E.-C. The Association between Eating-Out Rate and BMI in Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3186.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop