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Article

Neighborhood Environment Perceptions among Latinos in the U.S.

1
Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
2
Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
3
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3062; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173062
Received: 25 July 2019 / Revised: 16 August 2019 / Accepted: 21 August 2019 / Published: 23 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
In the U.S., immigrants and racial/ethnic minorities (e.g., Latinos) often report unfavorable neighborhood environments, which may hinder physical activity (PA). Among Latinos, PA levels are disproportionately lower in foreign-born, female, older, and low-education individuals. It is unclear whether these subgroups, including those from multiple disadvantaged backgrounds (e.g., low education, foreign-born), perceive worse neighborhood environments for PA. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine differences in neighborhood environment perceptions among Latinos in the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (N = 4643; 59% foreign-born). Logistic regression models examined nativity—and its interactions with age, gender, and education—in relation to the perceived presence of transportation infrastructure (two items) and destinations (four items), controlling for self-reported walking. Models used sample weights and accounted for the complex survey design. Nativity was not significantly associated with neighborhood environment perceptions. However, nativity interactions with age and education showed the greatest inequities (lowest perceptions) of neighborhood infrastructure (e.g., fewer sidewalks) or destinations (e.g., fewer places to relax) among disadvantaged U.S.-born (older or low education) and advantaged foreign-born (higher education) Latinos. Findings suggest neighborhood perceptions are shaped by complex interactions of nativity with structural (education) and contextual (age) factors. Additional research is needed to complement our findings and inform environmental interventions targeting Latinos. View Full-Text
Keywords: built environment; neighborhood perceptions; acculturation; inequities; Latinos; Hispanics built environment; neighborhood perceptions; acculturation; inequities; Latinos; Hispanics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Perez, L.G.; Ruiz, J.M.; Berrigan, D. Neighborhood Environment Perceptions among Latinos in the U.S. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3062. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173062

AMA Style

Perez LG, Ruiz JM, Berrigan D. Neighborhood Environment Perceptions among Latinos in the U.S. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(17):3062. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173062

Chicago/Turabian Style

Perez, Lilian G., John M. Ruiz, and David Berrigan. 2019. "Neighborhood Environment Perceptions among Latinos in the U.S." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 17: 3062. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173062

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