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The Moderation of Obesity Penalty on Job Market Outcomes by Employment Efforts

by Rosemary Ahn 1, Tae Hyun Kim 2,* and Euna Han 3,*
1
The Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
2
Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 037252, Korea
3
College of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, Incheon 21983, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2974; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162974
Received: 18 June 2019 / Revised: 9 August 2019 / Accepted: 16 August 2019 / Published: 19 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Economic Impact of Obesity)
The current study explores the moderation of the relationship between obesity and labor market outcomes by direct employment efforts such as job hunting and job training of young adults. The study used data provided by the Korean Education and Employment Panel, a longitudinal data survey comprising middle and high school students from 2004 to 2015. Two dependent variables were assessed in this study: employment status and wage. The individual-level fixed effects were controlled. Despite having more direct employment efforts of either or both experience in job hunting and job training, compared to normal-weight counterparts, underweight men and overweight and obese women were reported to have a disadvantage in both dependent variables. Underweight men with job training experience were 12.02% less likely to be employed, while overweight and obese men had 6.80 times higher monthly wages when job training experience was accompanied compared to no such experience. For overweight and obese women, compared to that of their normal-weight counterparts, employment probability decreased by 4.78% per week-increase in job hunting, by 2.81% if any experience in job hunting. For underweight women, compared to that of their normal-weight counterparts, employment probability increased by 4.56 times per week-increase in job hunting and by 5.59 times if experience in job hunting, and by 6.96% if experience in job training. The results indicate that employment efforts do not fully moderate the presence of obesity penalty for labor market outcomes on those early in their careers. View Full-Text
Keywords: Job efforts; obesity penalty; job performances; young adults Job efforts; obesity penalty; job performances; young adults
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Ahn, R.; Kim, T.H.; Han, E. The Moderation of Obesity Penalty on Job Market Outcomes by Employment Efforts. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2974.

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