Next Article in Journal
European Rural Development Policy Approaching Health Issues: An Exploration of Programming Schemes
Previous Article in Journal
The Impact of Social Disparities on Microbiological Quality of Drinking Water Supply in Ugu District Municipality of Kwazulu-Natal Province, South Africa
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evaluation of the Impacts of a Phone Warning and Advising System for Individuals Vulnerable to Smog. Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial Study in Canada
Open AccessArticle

The Water–Energy–Food Nexus as a Tool to Transform Rural Livelihoods and Well-Being in Southern Africa

1
Centre for Transformative Agricultural and Food Systems, School of Agricultural, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P. Bag X01, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3209, South Africa
2
International Water Management Institute, Southern Africa (IWMI-SA), 141 Creswell Street, Silverton, Pretoria 0184, South Africa
3
Water Research Commission of South Africa, 4 Daventry Street, Lynnwood Manor, Pretoria 0081, South Africa
4
School of Environmental Sciences, University of Venda, Private Bag X 5050, Thohoyandou 0950, South Africa
5
School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P. Bag X01, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3209, South Africa
6
School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P. Bag X01, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3209, South Africa
7
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), DAPO Box 7777, 1301 Metro Manila, Philippines
8
Department of Genetics, School of Genetics, Evolution & Environment, University College, London WC1E 6BT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2970; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162970
Received: 29 April 2019 / Revised: 19 June 2019 / Accepted: 13 August 2019 / Published: 18 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Adaptation to Climate Change)
About 60% of southern Africa’s population lives in rural areas with limited access to basic services and amenities such as clean and safe water, affordable and clean energy, and balanced and nutritious diets. Resource scarcity has direct and indirect impacts on nutrition, human health, and well-being of mostly poor rural communities. Climate change impacts in the region are manifesting through low crop yields, upsurge of vector borne diseases (malaria and dengue fever), and water and food-borne diseases (cholera and diarrhoea). This study applied a water–energy–food (WEF) nexus analytical livelihoods model with complex systems understanding to assess rural livelihoods, health, and well-being in southern Africa, recommending tailor-made adaptation strategies for the region aimed at building resilient rural communities. The WEF nexus is a decision support tool that improves rural livelihoods through integrated resource distribution, planning, and management, and ensures inclusive socio-economic transformation and development, and addresses related sustainable development goals, particularly goals 2, 3, 6 and 7. The integrated WEF nexus index for the region was calculated at 0.145, which is marginally sustainable, and indicating the region’s exposure to vulnerabilities, and reveals a major reason why the region fails to meet its developmental targets. The integrated relationship among WEF resources in southern Africa shows an imbalance and uneven resource allocation, utilisation and distribution, which normally results from a ‘siloed’ approach in resource management. The WEF nexus provides better adaptation options, as it guides decision making processes by identifying priority areas needing intervention, enhancing synergies, and minimising trade-offs necessary for resilient rural communities. Our results identified (i) the trade-offs and unintended negative consequences for poor rural households’ livelihoods of current silo approaches, (ii) mechanisms for sustainably enhancing household water, energy and food security, whilst (iii) providing direction for achieving SDGs 2, 3, 6 and 7. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; livelihoods; innovation; human well-being; WEF nexus; adaptation; health climate change; livelihoods; innovation; human well-being; WEF nexus; adaptation; health
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mabhaudhi, T.; Nhamo, L.; Mpandeli, S.; Nhemachena, C.; Senzanje, A.; Sobratee, N.; Chivenge, P.P.; Slotow, R.; Naidoo, D.; Liphadzi, S.; Modi, A.T. The Water–Energy–Food Nexus as a Tool to Transform Rural Livelihoods and Well-Being in Southern Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2970. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162970

AMA Style

Mabhaudhi T, Nhamo L, Mpandeli S, Nhemachena C, Senzanje A, Sobratee N, Chivenge PP, Slotow R, Naidoo D, Liphadzi S, Modi AT. The Water–Energy–Food Nexus as a Tool to Transform Rural Livelihoods and Well-Being in Southern Africa. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(16):2970. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162970

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe; Nhamo, Luxon; Mpandeli, Sylvester; Nhemachena, Charles; Senzanje, Aidan; Sobratee, Nafisa; Chivenge, Pauline P.; Slotow, Rob; Naidoo, Dhesigen; Liphadzi, Stanley; Modi, Albert T. 2019. "The Water–Energy–Food Nexus as a Tool to Transform Rural Livelihoods and Well-Being in Southern Africa" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 16: 2970. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162970

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop