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Open AccessArticle

Residential Wood Combustion in Finland: PM2.5 Emissions and Health Impacts with and without Abatement Measures

1
Finnish Environmental Institute (SYKE), Latokartanonkaari 11, 00790 Helsinki, Finland
2
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 70701 Kuopio, Finland
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland (UEF), 70210 Kuopio, Finland
4
Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), 00560 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2920; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162920
Received: 2 July 2019 / Revised: 30 July 2019 / Accepted: 1 August 2019 / Published: 14 August 2019
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Abstract

Exposure to fine particles in ambient air has been estimated to be one of the leading environmental health risks in Finland. Residential wood combustion is the largest domestic source of fine particles, and there is increasing political interest in finding feasible measures to reduce those emissions. In this paper, we present the PM2.5 emissions from residential wood combustion in Finland, as well as the resulting concentrations. We used population-weighed concentrations in a 250 × 250 m grid as population exposure estimates, with which we calculated the disease burden of the emissions. Compared to a projected baseline scenario, we studied the effect of chosen reduction measures in several abatement scenarios. In 2015, the resulting annual average concentrations were between 0.5 and 2 µg/m3 in the proximity of most cities, and disease burden attributable to residential wood combustion was estimated to be 3400 disability-adjusted life years (DALY) and 200 deaths. Disease burden decreased by 8% in the 2030 baseline scenario and by an additional 63% in the maximum feasible reduction scenario. Informational campaigns and improvement of the sauna stove stock were assessed to be the most feasible abatement measures to be implemented in national air quality policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: residential wood combustion; population exposure; disease burden; mortality; morbidity; particulate matter; fine particle concentrations residential wood combustion; population exposure; disease burden; mortality; morbidity; particulate matter; fine particle concentrations
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Savolahti, M.; Lehtomäki, H.; Karvosenoja, N.; Paunu, V.-V.; Korhonen, A.; Kukkonen, J.; Kupiainen, K.; Kangas, L.; Karppinen, A.; Hänninen, O. Residential Wood Combustion in Finland: PM2.5 Emissions and Health Impacts with and without Abatement Measures. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2920.

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