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The Association of Peer Smoking Behavior and Social Support with Quit Success in Employees Who Participated in a Smoking Cessation Intervention at the Workplace

1
Department of Family Medicine, Maastricht University (CAPHRI), 6229 HA Maastricht, The Netherlands
2
Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University (CAPHRI), 6229 HA Maastricht, The Netherlands
3
IVO Research Institute, 2595 AA The Hague, The Netherlands
4
Department of Methodology and Statistics, Maastricht University (CAPHRI), 6229 HA Maastricht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2831; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162831
Received: 18 July 2019 / Revised: 2 August 2019 / Accepted: 5 August 2019 / Published: 8 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
The current study investigated whether quit success among employees who participated in a smoking cessation intervention at the workplace was associated with social support from, and the smoking behavior of, people in their environment. Tobacco-smoking employees (n = 604) from 61 companies participated in a workplace group smoking cessation program. Participants completed questionnaires assessing social support from, and the smoking behavior of, people in their social environment. They were also tested for biochemically validated continuous abstinence directly after finishing the training and after 12 months. The data were analyzed using mixed-effects logistic regression analyses. Social support from colleagues was positively associated with 12-month quit success (odds ratio (OR) = 1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–3.00, p = 0.013). Support from a partner was positively associated with short-term quit success (OR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.23–3.30, p = 0.006). Having a higher proportion of smokers in the social environment was negatively associated with long-term abstinence (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.71–0.92, p = 0.002). Compared to having a non-smoking partner, long-term quit success was negatively associated with having no partner (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.26–0.88, p < 0.019), with having a partner who smokes (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.24–0.66, p < 0.001), and with having a partner who used to smoke (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.26–0.86, p = 0.014). In conclusion, people in a smoker’s social environment, particularly colleagues, were strongly associated with quit success. The workplace may, therefore, be a favorable setting for smoking cessation interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking cessation; workplace; employees; financial incentives; social support; peer support; social environment smoking cessation; workplace; employees; financial incentives; social support; peer support; social environment
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MDPI and ACS Style

van den Brand, F.A.; Nagtzaam, P.; Nagelhout, G.E.; Winkens, B.; van Schayck, C.P. The Association of Peer Smoking Behavior and Social Support with Quit Success in Employees Who Participated in a Smoking Cessation Intervention at the Workplace. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2831. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162831

AMA Style

van den Brand FA, Nagtzaam P, Nagelhout GE, Winkens B, van Schayck CP. The Association of Peer Smoking Behavior and Social Support with Quit Success in Employees Who Participated in a Smoking Cessation Intervention at the Workplace. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(16):2831. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162831

Chicago/Turabian Style

van den Brand, Floor A., Puck Nagtzaam, Gera E. Nagelhout, Bjorn Winkens, and Constant P. van Schayck. 2019. "The Association of Peer Smoking Behavior and Social Support with Quit Success in Employees Who Participated in a Smoking Cessation Intervention at the Workplace" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 16: 2831. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162831

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