Next Article in Journal
Contraceptive Behaviors in Polish Women Aged 18–35—A Cross-Sectional Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Perceived Parenting Styles and Adjustment during Emerging Adulthood: A Cross-National Perspective
Previous Article in Journal
Characterization of Indoor Air Quality on a College Campus: A Pilot Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Attachment Styles and Well-Being in Adolescents: How Does Emotional Development Affect This Relationship?
 
 
Article

Parental Style, Dating Violence and Gender

1
Department of Social Anthropology, Seville University, 41013 Seville, Spain
2
Department of Education and Social Psychology, Pablo de Olavide University, 41013 Seville, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(15), 2722; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152722
Received: 30 May 2019 / Revised: 25 July 2019 / Accepted: 26 July 2019 / Published: 30 July 2019
The relationship between parenting styles and teen dating violence has become a relevant research topic in recent years, especially related to violence inflicted online. To more fully understand this relationship, the objective of the present study was to examine which parenting style (authoritarian, indulgent, authoritative, or neglectful) best protects against dating violence in adolescent relationships. A total of 1132 adolescents of both sexes participated in this study (46.4% boys and 53.6% girls), with ages between 14 and 18 years old (M = 15.6, SD = 1.3). A multivariate factorial design was applied (MANOVA, 4 × 2), using the parenting style, the parents’ gender, and the adolescents’ gender as independent variables, and the dating violence dimensions (online and offline) as dependent variables. As the results show, the lowest scores on all the dating violence dimensions examined were obtained by adolescents from indulgent families. In addition, three interaction effects were observed between the mother’s parenting style and the adolescent’s gender on online violence (e-violence and control), and the father’s parenting style on offline violence (verbal-emotional). Thus, adolescents with authoritarian mothers obtained the highest scores on violence and control inflicted online, respectively, and adolescent girls with authoritarian fathers obtained the highest scores on verbal-emotional violence. These findings suggest that the indulgent style is the parenting style that protects against violence in teen dating relationships, and they also highlight the risks of the authoritarian style as a family child-rearing model. View Full-Text
Keywords: parenting style; dating violence; online; offline; gender parenting style; dating violence; online; offline; gender
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Muñiz-Rivas, M.; Vera, M.; Povedano-Díaz, A. Parental Style, Dating Violence and Gender. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2722. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152722

AMA Style

Muñiz-Rivas M, Vera M, Povedano-Díaz A. Parental Style, Dating Violence and Gender. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(15):2722. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152722

Chicago/Turabian Style

Muñiz-Rivas, María, María Vera, and Amapola Povedano-Díaz. 2019. "Parental Style, Dating Violence and Gender" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 15: 2722. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152722

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop