Next Article in Journal
Urban Metabolic Analysis of a Food-Water-Energy System for Sustainable Resources Management
Next Article in Special Issue
Elimination of Schistosoma japonicum Transmission in China: A Case of Schistosomiasis Control in the Severe Epidemic Area of Anhui Province
Previous Article in Journal
Direct Hospitalization Cost of Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Vietnam
Previous Article in Special Issue
Premature Adult Death and Equity Impact of a Reduction of NO2, PM10, and PM2.5 Levels in Paris—A Health Impact Assessment Study Conducted at the Census Block Level
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January-1) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010089

Beyond Commuting: Ignoring Individuals’ Activity-Travel Patterns May Lead to Inaccurate Assessments of Their Exposure to Traffic Congestion

Department of Geography and Geographic Information Science, Natural History Building, 1301 W Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 December 2018 / Revised: 25 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 30 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IJERPH: 15th Anniversary)
Full-Text   |   PDF [20846 KB, uploaded 30 December 2018]   |  

Abstract

This research examines whether individual exposures to traffic congestion are significantly different between assessments obtained with and without considering individuals’ activity-travel patterns in addition to commuting trips. We used crowdsourced real-time traffic congestion data and the activity-travel data of 250 individuals in Los Angeles to compare these two assessments of individual exposures to traffic congestion. The results revealed that individual exposures to traffic congestion are significantly underestimated when their activity-travel patterns are ignored, which has been postulated as a manifestation of the uncertain geographic context problem (UGCoP). The results also highlighted that the probability distribution function of exposures is heavily skewed but tends to converge to its average when individuals’ activity-travel patterns are considered when compared to one obtained when those patterns are not considered, which indicates the existence of the neighborhood effect averaging problem (NEAP). Lastly, space-time visualizations of individual exposures illustrated that people’s exposures to traffic congestion vary significantly even if they live at the same residential location due to their idiosyncratic activity-travel patterns. The results corroborate the claims in previous studies that using data aggregated over areas (e.g., census tracts) or focusing only on commuting trips (and thus ignoring individuals’ activity-travel patterns) may lead to erroneous assessments of individual exposures to traffic congestion or other environmental influences. View Full-Text
Keywords: traffic congestion; activity-travel patterns; real-time traffic data; the uncertain geographic context problem (UGCoP); the neighborhood effect averaging problem (NEAP) traffic congestion; activity-travel patterns; real-time traffic data; the uncertain geographic context problem (UGCoP); the neighborhood effect averaging problem (NEAP)
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, J.; Kwan, M.-P. Beyond Commuting: Ignoring Individuals’ Activity-Travel Patterns May Lead to Inaccurate Assessments of Their Exposure to Traffic Congestion. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 89.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top