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Open AccessArticle

The Association between Indoor Air Quality and Adult Blood Pressure Levels in a High-Income Setting

1
School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6148, Australia
2
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
3
College of Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 2026; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092026
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 12 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 September 2018 / Published: 17 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Pollution and Health)
Background: Indoor air pollution is still considered one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. We aimed to investigate the potential association between indoor particulate matter (PM) and fasting clinic blood pressure in adult Australians. Methods: Sixty-three participants residing within the Perth metropolitan area were studied. Participants were aged between 18 and 65 years and free of major medical conditions. We conducted 24-h monitoring of residential PM concentrations, including the size fractions PM1, PM2.5, PM4, and PM10. All participants attended a clinical assessment at Curtin University following a 10–12 h overnight fast. Results: In this study we found that PM1 and PM2.5 were significantly associated with heart rate: a one interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM1 or PM2.5 was associated with a 4–6 beats per minute (bpm) increase in heart rate. Both PM10 and total PM exposure had a significant impact on systolic blood pressure (SBP): a one IQR increase in PM10 and total PM were associated with a 10 mmHg (95% CI: 0.77–20.05) and 12 mmHg (2.28–22.43 mmHg) increase in SBP, respectively. Conclusion: The study findings provide additional support to the thesis that indoor air pollution is an important modifiable factor in the risk of hypertension. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor air quality; particulate air pollution; blood pressure; heart rate; Australia indoor air quality; particulate air pollution; blood pressure; heart rate; Australia
MDPI and ACS Style

Rumchev, K.; Soares, M.; Zhao, Y.; Reid, C.; Huxley, R. The Association between Indoor Air Quality and Adult Blood Pressure Levels in a High-Income Setting. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2026.

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