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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1993; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091993

Resistance of Escherichia coli in Turkeys after Therapeutic or Environmental Exposition with Enrofloxacin Depending on Flooring

1
Institute for Animal Nutrition, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bischofsholer Damm 15, D-30173 Hanover, Germany
2
Department of Nutrition and Nutritional Deficiency Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516, Egypt
3
Institute for Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Pharmacy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 17, D-30559 Hannover, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 July 2018 / Revised: 30 August 2018 / Accepted: 11 September 2018 / Published: 13 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobials and Antimicrobial Resistance in the Environment)
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Abstract

Gaining knowledge about the spread of resistance against antibacterial agents is a primary challenge in livestock farming. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of double antibiotic treatment (at days 10–14 and days 26–30) with enrofloxacin or solely environmental exposition (identical times, directly into the litter) on resistance against antibacterial agents in commensal Escherichia coli in comparison with the control (without treatment), depending on different flooring. A total of 720 Big 6 turkeys participated in three trials. Four different flooring designs were examined: An entire floor pen covered with litter, a floor pen with heating, a partially slatted flooring including 50% littered area, and a fully slatted flooring with a sand bath. A total of 864 Escherichia coli isolates were obtained from cloacal swabs and poultry manure samples at days 2, 9, 15, 21, and 35. The broth microdilution method (MIC) was used to determine the resistance of isolates to enrofloxacin and ampicillin. A double antibiotic treatment with enrofloxacin reduced the proportion of susceptible Escherichia coli isolates significantly in all flooring designs. Simulation of water losses had no significant effect, nor did the flooring design. Ampicillin-resistant isolates were observed, despite not using ampicillin. View Full-Text
Keywords: flooring design; Turkey; antibacterial resistance; enrofloxacin; commensal E. coli flooring design; Turkey; antibacterial resistance; enrofloxacin; commensal E. coli
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Chuppava, B.; Keller, B.; El-Wahab, A.A.; Meißner, J.; Kietzmann, M.; Visscher, C. Resistance of Escherichia coli in Turkeys after Therapeutic or Environmental Exposition with Enrofloxacin Depending on Flooring. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1993.

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