Next Article in Journal
The Potential Implications of Autonomous Vehicles in and around the Workplace
Previous Article in Journal
Healthy Indoor Environments: The Need for a Holistic Approach
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1875; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091875

Which School Community Agents Influence Adolescents’ Motivational Outcomes and Physical Activity? Are More Autonomy-Supportive Relationships Necessarily Better?

1
Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, Department of Didactics of the Musical, Plastic and Corporal Expression, University of Zaragoza, 22001 Huesca, Spain
2
Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Department of Didactics of the Musical, Plastic and Corporal Expression, University of Zaragoza, 22003 Huesca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 July 2018 / Revised: 18 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 30 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
  |  
PDF [896 KB, uploaded 6 September 2018]
  |  

Abstract

The first aim of this work was to examine the independent influence of students’ perceived autonomy support for leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), from different school community agents, on motivational outcomes in a LTPA context and objective PA levels. Using both a variable- and person-centered approach, the second aim was to examine how different combinations of autonomy-support were associated with students’ motivational outcomes in a LTPA context and PA levels. A sample of 178 secondary students (M = 13.26 ± 0.64) participated in the study. Autonomy support for LTPA from the PE teacher, mother, father, and peers were the only agents that significantly and positively predicted motivational outcomes in a LTPA context and PA levels. While the two- and three-way interactions of some of these four significant sources significantly increased the explained variance of some motivational outcomes, the plots revealed that the lowest values of motivational outcomes were associated with low values of perceived autonomy support. A cluster analysis revealed five profiles. The “high autonomy support” group reported the most optimal outcomes, whereas the “low autonomy support” group showed the opposite pattern. However, mixed autonomy support profiles did not differ in any of the outcomes. The adoption of a whole-of-school approach seems decisive to empower adolescents to be active in and out of school. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; health promotion; school; autonomy support; autonomous motivation; basic psychological needs; intention to be physically active; adolescence; self-determination theory physical activity; health promotion; school; autonomy support; autonomous motivation; basic psychological needs; intention to be physically active; adolescence; self-determination theory
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sevil, J.; García-González, L.; Abós, Á.; Generelo Lanaspa, E.; Aibar Solana, A. Which School Community Agents Influence Adolescents’ Motivational Outcomes and Physical Activity? Are More Autonomy-Supportive Relationships Necessarily Better? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1875.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top