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Open AccessArticle

Learning and Action in Community Health: Using the Health Belief Model to Assess and Educate African American Community Residents about Participation in Clinical Research

1
Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Dr., Atlanta, GA 30310, USA
2
John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, 651 Ilalo Street, BSB 320, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
3
Clinical Research Center, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Dr., Atlanta, GA 30310, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1862; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091862
Received: 16 July 2018 / Revised: 22 August 2018 / Accepted: 23 August 2018 / Published: 28 August 2018
The Learning and Action in Community Health project was implemented to gather preliminary data needed to inform community-engaged educational approaches to increase clinical research participation among racial minorities. The Health Belief Model was the theoretical framework utilized to develop the intervention and assessment tools. An educational session about clinical research and biorepository participation was designed using clinicaltrials.gov information and administered to adult, African American community residents (n = 60) in Atlanta, Georgia. Pre- and post-tests were collected and analyzed to assess changes in participants’ knowledge, perceptions, and willingness to participate in clinical studies and biorepositories. There were statistically significant changes in knowledge about joining a clinical study (p < 0.001) and registry or biorepository (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant change in willingness to participate in clinical research or biorepositories after the educational session. Focus groups were conducted to gather feedback on the educational session and perceived barriers and benefits to participating in clinical research. Perceived benefits were improving health, receiving incentives, early detection of health issues, and access to care. Perceived barriers included fear, lack of knowledge, historical mistrust of research, and time constraints. Results have implications for subsequent community-engaged approaches to increasing minority participation in clinical research. View Full-Text
Keywords: biorepository; clinical research; minority participation; African Americans; community engagement; health belief model biorepository; clinical research; minority participation; African Americans; community engagement; health belief model
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Rollins, L.; Sy, A.; Crowell, N.; Rivers, D.; Miller, A.; Cooper, P.; Teague, D.; Jackson, C.; Henry Akintobi, T.; Ofili, E. Learning and Action in Community Health: Using the Health Belief Model to Assess and Educate African American Community Residents about Participation in Clinical Research. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1862.

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