Next Article in Journal
Fabrication of Surfactant-Enhanced Metal Oxides Catalyst for Catalytic Ozonation Ammonia in Water
Next Article in Special Issue
Using a Clustering Approach to Investigate Socio-Environmental Inequality in Preterm Birth—A Study Conducted at Fine Spatial Scale in Paris (France)
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Highway-Related Pollutant on the Groundwater Quality of Turfy Swamps in the Changbai Mountain Area
Previous Article in Special Issue
Comparative Evaluation of Arabin Pessary and Cervical Cerclage for the Prevention of Preterm Labor in Asymptomatic Women with High Risk Factors
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1653; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081653

Sepiolite-Based Adsorbents for the Removal of Potentially Toxic Elements from Water: A Strategic Review for the Case of Environmental Contamination in Hunan, China

1
Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Shale Gas Resource Exploitation, Hunan University of Science & Technology, Xiangtan 411201, China
2
School of Civil Engineering, Hunan University of Science & Technology, Xiangtan 411201, China
3
School of Computing, Engineering & Physical Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 July 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 2 August 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IJERPH: 15th Anniversary)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1512 KB, uploaded 9 August 2018]   |  

Abstract

The last few decades have seen rapid industrialization and urban development in many regions globally; with associated pollution by potentially toxic elements; which have become a threat to human health and the food chain. This is particularly prevalent in a number of regions in China that host multiple mineral resources and are important agricultural locations. Solutions to protect contamination of the food chain are more effective and sustainable if locally sourced materials are available; and in this context; we review the potential of local (sepiolite) mineral deposits to treat water contamination in the Hunan Municipality; central south China; widely recognized for significant environmental pollution issues (particularly by Hg; Cd; Pb; and Cr) and the high agricultural productivity of the region. Sepiolite is an abundant fibrous clay mineral with modest to good adsorption properties and extensive industrial process applications. It shows reasonable performance as an adsorbent for element removal. In addition; a number of surface modification strategies are available that improve this capability. We review these studies; focused on sorption reaction mechanisms and regeneration potential; with a view to present options for a localized and effective economic strategy for future application. View Full-Text
Keywords: sepiolite; adsorption; potentially toxic elements; modification; regeneration; Xiangjiang River sepiolite; adsorption; potentially toxic elements; modification; regeneration; Xiangjiang River
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, Z.; Liao, L.; Hursthouse, A.; Song, N.; Ren, B. Sepiolite-Based Adsorbents for the Removal of Potentially Toxic Elements from Water: A Strategic Review for the Case of Environmental Contamination in Hunan, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1653.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top