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Open AccessArticle

Factors Associated with Continued Food Insecurity among Households Recovering from Hurricane Katrina

1
Health Services Administration, D’Youville College, Buffalo, NY 14201, USA
2
Christiana Care Health System, Value Institute, Wilmington, DE 19899, USA
3
Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
4
College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1647; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081647
Received: 18 June 2018 / Revised: 14 July 2018 / Accepted: 25 July 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addressing Food and Nutrition Security in Developed Countries)
In 2010, 14.5% of US households experienced food insecurity, which adversely impacts health. Some groups are at increased risk for food insecurity, such as female-headed households, and those same groups are often also at increased risk for disaster exposure and the negative consequences that come with exposure. Little research has been done on food insecurity post-disaster. The present study investigates long-term food insecurity among households heavily impacted by Hurricane Katrina. A sample of 683 households participating in the Gulf Coast Child and Family Health Study were examined using a generalized estimation model to determine protective and risk factors for food insecurity during long-term recovery. Higher income (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.84, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.77, 0.91), having a partner (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.89, 0.97), or “other” race were found to be protective against food insecurity over a five-year period following disaster exposure. Low social support (OR 1.14; 95% CI 1.08, 1.20), poor physical health (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.03, 1.13) or mental health (OR 1.13; 95% CI 1.09, 1.18), and female sex (OR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01, 1.10) were risk factors. Policies and programs that increase access to food supplies among high-risk groups are needed to reduce the negative health impacts of disasters. View Full-Text
Keywords: food insecurity; disaster; family health; Hurricane Katrina; mental health; physical health; social support food insecurity; disaster; family health; Hurricane Katrina; mental health; physical health; social support
MDPI and ACS Style

Clay, L.A.; Papas, M.A.; Gill, K.B.; Abramson, D.M. Factors Associated with Continued Food Insecurity among Households Recovering from Hurricane Katrina. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1647.

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