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Open AccessArticle

Ventilation and Air Quality in Student Dormitories in China: A Case Study during Summer in Nanjing

School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, China
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1328; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071328
Received: 20 May 2018 / Revised: 14 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 25 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Environmental Quality)
The Air quality in student dormitories can have a major impact on the health of millions of students in China. This study aims to investigate the ventilation and air quality in student dormitories. Questionnaire survey was conducted in eight dormitory buildings and field measurements were conducted in one dormitory during the summer in Nanjing. The survey result reveals that most students thought the indoor and outdoor air quality was neutral and the correlation between indoor and outdoor perceived air quality is statistically significant. There are few indoor PM2.5 and ozone sources in dormitories and natural ventilation is the most common form of ventilation. However, there is no statistically significant correlation between window opening behaviors and the perceptions of indoor and outdoor air quality. The field measurement result shows the measured I/O ratios of PM2.5 and ozone over 37 days are in the range of 0.42–0.79 and 0.21–1.00, respectively. The I/O ratios for PM2.5 and ozone are 0.49 ± 0.05 and 0.26 ± 0.05 in the case of the window being closed, and the I/O ratios for PM2.5 and ozone are 0.65 ± 0.08 and 0.50 ± 0.15 in the case of the window being open. The outdoor and indoor ozone concentrations show pronounced diurnal periodic variations, while the PM2.5 concentrations do not. Finally, recommended open/close window strategies are discussed to reduce indoor pollutant levels. Understanding the indoor/outdoor PM2.5 and ozone concentrations in different window patterns can be a guidance to preventing high indoor PM2.5 and ozone exposure in student dormitories. View Full-Text
Keywords: PM2.5; ozone; student dormitory; I/O ratio; ventilation; indoor air quality PM2.5; ozone; student dormitory; I/O ratio; ventilation; indoor air quality
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Yang, Z.; Shen, J.; Gao, Z. Ventilation and Air Quality in Student Dormitories in China: A Case Study during Summer in Nanjing. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1328.

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