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A System Based on the Internet of Things for Real-Time Particle Monitoring in Buildings

1
Unit for Inland Development, Polytechnic Institute of Guarda, Avenida Doutor Francisco Sá Carneiro N° 50, 6300-559 Guarda, Portugal
2
Department of Imagiology, Hospital Centre and University of Coimbra (CHUC), 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 821; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040821
Received: 20 March 2018 / Revised: 11 April 2018 / Accepted: 18 April 2018 / Published: 21 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Environmental Quality)
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Abstract

Occupational health can be strongly influenced by the indoor environment as people spend 90% of their time indoors. Although indoor air quality (IAQ) is not typically monitored, IAQ parameters could be in many instances very different from those defined as healthy values. Particulate matter (PM), a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles of organic and inorganic substances suspended in the air, is considered the pollutant that affects more people. The most health-damaging particles are the ≤PM10 (diameter of 10 microns or less), which can penetrate and lodge deep inside the lungs, contributing to the risk of developing cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, as well as of lung cancer. This paper presents an Internet of Things (IoT) system for real-time PM monitoring named iDust. This system is based on a WEMOS D1 mini microcontroller and a PMS5003 PM sensor that incorporates scattering principle to measure the value of particles suspended in the air (PM10, PM2.5, and PM1.0). Through a Web dashboard for data visualization and remote notifications, the building manager can plan interventions for enhanced IAQ and ambient assisted living (AAL). Compared to other solutions the iDust is based on open-source technologies, providing a total Wi-Fi system, with several advantages such as its modularity, scalability, low cost, and easy installation. The results obtained are very promising, representing a meaningful tool on the contribution to IAQ and occupational health. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor air quality (IAQ); healthy buildings; occupational health; particulate matter (PM); real-time monitoring; internet of things (IoT) indoor air quality (IAQ); healthy buildings; occupational health; particulate matter (PM); real-time monitoring; internet of things (IoT)
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Marques, G.; Roque Ferreira, C.; Pitarma, R. A System Based on the Internet of Things for Real-Time Particle Monitoring in Buildings. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 821.

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