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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061230

Agreement between Future Parents on Infant Feeding Intentions and Its Association with Breastfeeding Duration: Results from the Growing Up in New Zealand Cohort Study

1
Growing Up in New Zealand, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
2
Centre for Longitudinal Research-He Ara ki Mua, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
3
Department of Paediatrics: Child and Youth Health, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
4
General Paediatrics, Starship Children’s Hospital, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
5
Australian Institute of Family Studies, Melbourne, Victoria 3006, Australia
6
School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 25 May 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in the First 1000 Days)
Full-Text   |   PDF [321 KB, uploaded 11 June 2018]

Abstract

Maternal intentions are believed to have the strongest influence on infant feeding. However, what has rarely been studied, are the associations of maternal and partner intentions, and the influence these factors have on infant feeding. Our objective was to describe breastfeeding intentions of pregnant women and their partners, agreement about these intentions, and whether this agreement is associated with breastfeeding initiation and duration. This study was completed within the Growing Up in New Zealand study. Agreement between mothers and partners on intended initial infant feeding method was fair (κ = 0.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17–0.25) as was intended breastfeeding duration (κ = 0.25, 95% CI 0.22–0.28). Infants whose parents agreed antenatally on breastfeeding only were more likely to have been breastfed for >6 months, after adjustment for maternal (odds ratio (OR) = 6.3, 95% CI 3.9–10.2) and partner demographics (OR = 5.7, 95% CI 3.6–9.2). Likewise, infants whose parents agreed antenatally to breastfeed for >6 months were more likely to have been breastfed for >6 months, after adjustment for maternal (OR = 4.9, 95% CI 3.9–6.2) and partner demographics (OR = 5.0, 95% CI 4.0–6.3). Interventions that promote breastfeeding to both mothers and partners which enable parents to reach agreement about intended feeding methods have the potential to increase both breastfeeding initiation and duration. View Full-Text
Keywords: breastfeeding; pregnant; partners; intentions; duration breastfeeding; pregnant; partners; intentions; duration
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Marks, E.J.; Grant, C.C.; de Castro, T.G.; Bandara, D.K.; Wall, C.; Morton, S.M.B. Agreement between Future Parents on Infant Feeding Intentions and Its Association with Breastfeeding Duration: Results from the Growing Up in New Zealand Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1230.

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