Next Article in Journal
Independent and Joint Contributions of Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Population Vulnerability to Mortality in the Detroit Metropolitan Area
Previous Article in Journal
Cross-Sectional Inverse Associations of Obesity and Fat Accumulation Indicators with Testosterone in Non-Diabetic Aging Men
Article Menu
Issue 6 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Case Study of Resilient Baton Rouge: Applying Depression Collaborative Care and Community Planning to Disaster Recovery

1
Resilient Baton Rouge, 100 North Street, Suite 900, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, USA
2
Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA David Geffin School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3
School of Medicine, Section of Community and Population Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 433 Bolivar St, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
4
Executive Director, Baton Rouge Health District
5
Baton Rouge Area Foundation, 100 North Street, Suite 900, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, USA
6
St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA
7
Louisiana Community Health Outreach Network, 1226 N. Broad, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA
8
UCLA Center for Health Services and Society, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
9
Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave. SL-16 New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1208; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061208
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 29 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
  |  
PDF [366 KB, uploaded 12 June 2018]

Abstract

Background: Addressing behavioral health impacts of major disasters is a priority of increasing national attention, but there are limited examples of implementation strategies to guide new disaster responses. We provide a case study of an effort being applied in response to the 2016 Great Flood in Baton Rouge. Methods: Resilient Baton Rouge was designed to support recovery after major flooding by building local capacity to implement an expanded model of depression collaborative care for adults, coupled with identifying and responding to local priorities and assets for recovery. For a descriptive, initial evaluation, we coupled analysis of documents and process notes with descriptive surveys of participants in initial training and orientation, including preliminary comparisons among licensed and non-licensed participants to identify training priorities. Results: We expanded local behavioral health service delivery capacity through subgrants to four agencies, provision of training tailored to licensed and non-licensed providers and development of advisory councils and partnerships with grassroots and government agencies. We also undertook initial efforts to enhance national collaboration around post-disaster resilience. Conclusion: Our partnered processes and lessons learned may be applicable to other communities that aim to promote resilience, as well as planning for and responding to post-disaster behavioral health needs. View Full-Text
Keywords: disaster; community resilience; behavioral health; collaborative care; community health workers; cognitive behavioral therapy; depression disaster; community resilience; behavioral health; collaborative care; community health workers; cognitive behavioral therapy; depression
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Keegan, R.; Grover, L.T.; Patron, D.; Sugarman, O.K.; Griffith, K.; Sonnier, S.; Springgate, B.F.; Jumonville, L.C.; Gardner, S.; Massey, W.; Miranda, J.; Chung, B.; Wells, K.B.; Phillippi, S.; Trapido, E.; Ramirez, A.; Meyers, D.; Haywood, C.; Landry, C.; Wennerstrom, A. Case Study of Resilient Baton Rouge: Applying Depression Collaborative Care and Community Planning to Disaster Recovery. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1208.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top