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Open AccessArticle

Importance of Footwear for Preventing Xerosis and Hyperkeratosis in Older People with Psychiatric Disorders Living in an Institution

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Department of Nursing, Centro Universitario de Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, 10600 Plasencia, Cáceres, Spain
2
Department of Pharmacology, Centro Universitario de Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, 10600 Plasencia, Cáceres, Spain
3
Department of Anatomy and Human Embryology, Centro Universitario de Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, 10600 Plasencia, Cáceres, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040584
Received: 16 February 2018 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 24 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Aging and Public Health)
Few studies have focused on the relation between the use and characteristics of footwear and the presence of foot lesions in people with psychiatric disorders. This work analyzes the influence of different footwear habits on the presence of deformities and ungueal and dermal pathologies of the foot of institutionalized people with psychiatric disorders compared to people without these disorders. A transversal and observational study was conducted on 107 participants, divided into two groups who have used different types of shoes throughout their lives. The control group comprised 63 autonomous people who mainly use leather footwear and a study group of 44 institutionalized people with intellectual disabilities and psychiatric disorders who mainly use textile footwear. There were significant differences between populations. The group with psychiatric disorders presented more xerosis and hyperkeratosis. Footwear with inappropriate characteristics is a possible causal agent of skin alterations. Wearing footwear with quality textile uppers, e.g., fabric or felt, could influence the appearance of these alterations. Leather footwear is recommended for institutionalized people to reduce symptoms of xerosis and improve their quality of life. View Full-Text
Keywords: elderly care; carers/families; foot deformities; quality of care; shoes; psychiatric disorder elderly care; carers/families; foot deformities; quality of care; shoes; psychiatric disorder
MDPI and ACS Style

Pérez-Pico, A.M.; Marcos-Tejedor, F.; Iglesias-Sánchez, M.J.; Acevedo, R.M. Importance of Footwear for Preventing Xerosis and Hyperkeratosis in Older People with Psychiatric Disorders Living in an Institution. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 584.

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