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The More Educated, the Healthier: Evidence from Rural China

1
Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
3
College of Management and Economics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China
4
Center for Social Science Survey and Data, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China
5
China Center for Agricultural Policy, School of Advanced Agricultural Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
6
International Ecosystem Management Partnership, United Nations Environment Programme, Beijing 100101, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2848; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122848
Received: 5 November 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 13 December 2018
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PDF [332 KB, uploaded 13 December 2018]

Abstract

Education, as an important aspect of human capital, not only affects the economic returns of an individual, but also affects non-economic returns. This paper uses data from the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS) in 2014 and explores the impact of education on the health status of rural residents by using the family fixed-effect model. We find that education can improve the self-reported health status and reduce the possibility of depression of rural residents. We also find that the effect of education on self-reported health status of rural young people more significant than that of middle-aged and old people, but the effect on depression score was weaker than that of middle-aged and old people. Compared with the high-income group, education improved the health of the lowest income group more significantly. Finally, we explore the mechanism of education affecting the health of rural residents from a multi-dimensional perspective. View Full-Text
Keywords: rural labor force; education; self-reported health; mental health rural labor force; education; self-reported health; mental health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Wang, W.; Dong, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhang, L.; Bai, Y.; Hagist, S. The More Educated, the Healthier: Evidence from Rural China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2848.

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