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Article

Spatio-Temporal Change and Pollution Risk of Agricultural Soil Cadmium in a Rapidly Industrializing Area in the Yangtze Delta Region of China

1
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Agricultural Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science &Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
2
State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2743; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122743
Received: 6 November 2018 / Revised: 26 November 2018 / Accepted: 2 December 2018 / Published: 5 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Environmental Biogeochemistry)
The impacts of rapid industrialization on agricultural soil cadmium (Cd) accumulation and their potential risks have drawn major attention from the scientific community and decision-makers, due to the high toxicity of Cd to animals and humans. A total of 812 topsoil samples (0–20 cm) was collected from the southern parts of Jiangsu Province, China, in 2000 and 2015, respectively. Geostatistical ordinary kriging and conditional sequential Gaussian simulation were used to quantify the changes in spatial distributions and the potential risk of Cd pollution between the two sampling dates. Results showed that across the study area, the mean Cd concentrations increased from 0.110 mg/kg in 2000 to 0.196 mg/kg in 2015, representing an annual average increase of 5.73 μg/kg. Given a confidence level of 95%, areas with significantly-increased Cd covered approximately 12% of the study area. Areas with a potential risk of Cd pollution in 2000 only covered 0.009% of the study area, while this figure increased to 0.75% in 2015. In addition, the locally concentrating trend of soil Cd pollution risk was evident after 15 years. Although multiple factors contributed to this elevated Cd pollution risk, the primary reason can be attributed to the enhanced atmospheric deposition and industrial waste discharge resulting from rapid industrialization, and the quick increase of traffic and transportation associated with rapid urbanization. View Full-Text
Keywords: agricultural soils; cadmium (Cd); potential pollution risk; industrialization and urbanization agricultural soils; cadmium (Cd); potential pollution risk; industrialization and urbanization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, X.; Qian, J.; Xie, E.; Shi, X.; Zhao, Y. Spatio-Temporal Change and Pollution Risk of Agricultural Soil Cadmium in a Rapidly Industrializing Area in the Yangtze Delta Region of China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2743. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122743

AMA Style

Xu X, Qian J, Xie E, Shi X, Zhao Y. Spatio-Temporal Change and Pollution Risk of Agricultural Soil Cadmium in a Rapidly Industrializing Area in the Yangtze Delta Region of China. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(12):2743. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122743

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Xianghua, Jiaying Qian, Enze Xie, Xuezheng Shi, and Yongcun Zhao. 2018. "Spatio-Temporal Change and Pollution Risk of Agricultural Soil Cadmium in a Rapidly Industrializing Area in the Yangtze Delta Region of China" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 12: 2743. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122743

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