Next Article in Journal
Contribution of the Economic Crisis to the Risk Increase of Poor Mental Health in a Region of Spain
Previous Article in Journal
Transitions in Tobacco Product Use by U.S. Adults between 2013–2014 and 2014–2015: Findings from the PATH Study Wave 1 and Wave 2
Open AccessArticle

A Raster-Based Subdividing Indicator to Map Urban Heat Vulnerability: A Case Study in Sydney, Australia

1
School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
2
Research Center of Urban and Regional Planning in Southwest China, Chongqing 400715, China
3
School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2516; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112516
Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 5 November 2018 / Accepted: 7 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
Assessing and mapping urban heat vulnerability has developed significantly over the past decade. Many studies have mapped urban heat vulnerability with a census unit-based general indicator (CGI). However, this kind of indicator has many problems, such as inaccurate assessment results and lacking comparability among different studies. This paper seeks to address this research gap and proposes a raster-based subdividing indicator to map urban heat vulnerability. We created a raster-based subdividing indicator (RSI) to map urban heat vulnerability from 3 aspects: exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. We applied and compared it with a raster-based general indicator (RGI) and a census unit-based general indicator (CGI) in Sydney, Australia. Spatial statistics and analysis were used to investigate the performance among those three indicators. The results indicate that: (1) compared with the RSI framework, 67.54% of very high heat vulnerability pixels were ignored in the RGI framework; and up to 83.63% of very high heat vulnerability pixels were ignored in the CGI framework; (2) Compared with the previous CGI framework, a RSI framework has many advantages. These include more accurate results, more flexible model structure, and higher comparability among different studies. This study recommends using a RSI framework to map urban heat vulnerability in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: heat vulnerability; indicators; mapping; demography; public health; Sydney heat vulnerability; indicators; mapping; demography; public health; Sydney
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, W.; McManus, P.; Duncan, E. A Raster-Based Subdividing Indicator to Map Urban Heat Vulnerability: A Case Study in Sydney, Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2516.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop