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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2486; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112486

The Tree Is My Anchor: A Pilot Study on the Treatment of BED through Nature-Based Therapy

1
Department of Geoscience and Natural Resource Management, Rolighedsvej 23, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
2
Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark
3
National Knowledge Center on Eating Disorders and Self Harm, Dronningens Tværgade 46, 1302 Copenhagen C, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 October 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nature-Based Therapies and Human Health)
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Abstract

Binge eating disorder (BED), characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating with a subjective experience of lack of control, is the world’s most common eating disorder. The aim of the present pilot study was to examine the feasibility of implementing nature-based therapy (NBT) in the treatment of BED. The NBT intervention was compared to Support Group Meetings (SGMs), which are the only publicly available form of support for people diagnosed with BED in Denmark. Twenty participants with a BED diagnosis were included in the study, which had a mixed-methods design including Eating Disorder Examination interviews, semi-structured interviews, and questionnaires measuring well-being (The Psychological General Well-Being Index) and self-esteem (Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale). Both the NBT and the SGMs showed positive results on all outcome measures (decreases in binge eating episodes and increases in general psychological well-being and self-esteem). The interviews indicated that the NBT context made the psychotherapeutic content more accessible to the participants and further helped them transfer the therapeutic gains to daily life after completing treatment. However, these results should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample size—ideally, they would need to be tested on a larger, randomized sample. View Full-Text
Keywords: eating disorder; binge eating; therapy garden; health-promoting natural environments; acceptance and commitment therapy; health design; eating disorder examination; psychological general well-being eating disorder; binge eating; therapy garden; health-promoting natural environments; acceptance and commitment therapy; health design; eating disorder examination; psychological general well-being
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Corazon, S.S.; Sidenius, U.; Vammen, K.S.; Klinker, S.E.; Stigsdotter, U.K.; Poulsen, D.V. The Tree Is My Anchor: A Pilot Study on the Treatment of BED through Nature-Based Therapy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2486.

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