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Accessibility and Acceptability of Infectious Disease Interventions Among Migrants in the EU/EEA: A CERQual Systematic Review

1
Bruyère Research Institute, 85 Primrose Ave, Annex E, Ottawa, ON K1R 6M1, Canada
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Departments of Family Medicine & Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5, Canada
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Department of Paediatrics, Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Preventive Medicine, Universität Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
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Division of Infectious Diseases, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3T 1E2, Canada
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Centre for Clinical Epidemiology of the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC H3T 1E2, Canada
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European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 16973 Stockholm, Sweden
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Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112329
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 16 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Refugee, Migrant and Ethnic Minority Health)
In the EU/EEA, subgroups of international migrants have an increased prevalence of certain infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to examine migrants’ acceptability, value placed on outcomes, and accessibility of infectious disease interventions. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative reviews adhering to the PRISMA reporting guidelines. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, DARE, and CDSR, and assessed review quality using AMSTAR. We conducted a framework analysis based on the Health Beliefs Model, which was used to organize our preliminary findings with respect to the beliefs that underlie preventive health behavior, including knowledge of risk factors, perceived susceptibility, severity and barriers, and cues to action. We assessed confidence in findings using an adapted GRADE CERQual tool. We included 11 qualitative systematic reviews from 2111 articles. In these studies, migrants report several facilitators to public health interventions. Acceptability depended on migrants’ relationship with healthcare practitioners, knowledge of the disease, and degree of disease-related stigma. Facilitators to public health interventions relevant for migrant populations may provide clues for implementation. Trust, cultural sensitivity, and communication skills also have implications for linkage to care and public health practitioner education. Recommendations from practitioners continue to play a key role in the acceptance of infectious disease interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: access to care; disease prevention; public health; stigma; refugees; migrants access to care; disease prevention; public health; stigma; refugees; migrants
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Driedger, M.; Mayhew, A.; Welch, V.; Agbata, E.; Gruner, D.; Greenaway, C.; Noori, T.; Sandu, M.; Sangou, T.; Mathew, C.; Kaur, H.; Pareek, M.; Pottie, K. Accessibility and Acceptability of Infectious Disease Interventions Among Migrants in the EU/EEA: A CERQual Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2329.

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