Next Article in Journal
Oral Microbiota of the Snake Bothrops lanceolatus in Martinique
Next Article in Special Issue
Reduced Lung Function among Workers in Primary Coffee Processing Factories in Ethiopia: A Cross Sectional Study
Previous Article in Journal
Social Network Analysis and Resilience in University Students: An Approach from Cohesiveness
Previous Article in Special Issue
Data-Driven Approach to Improving the Risk Assessment Process of Medical Failures
Open AccessArticle

The Epidemiology, Cost, and Occupational Context of Spinal Injuries Sustained While ‘Working for Income’ in NSW: A Record-Linkage Study

1
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia
2
John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Kolling Institute, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia
3
Department Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
4
The George Institute for Global Health, Newtown, NSW 2042, Australia
5
School of Public Health, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2033, Australia
6
School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia
7
Agency for Clinical Innovation, Chatswood, NSW 2067, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2121; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102121
Received: 8 September 2018 / Revised: 20 September 2018 / Accepted: 23 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Worker and Public Health and Safety: Current Views)
This study aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics, the occupational context, and the cost of hospitalised work-related traumatic spinal injuries, across New South Wales, Australia. A record-linkage study of hospitalised cases of work-related spinal injury (ICD10-AM code U73.0 or workers compensation) was conducted. Study period 2013–2016. Eight hundred and twenty-four individuals sustained work-related spinal injuries; 86.2% of whom were males and had a mean age of 46.6 years. Falls led to 50% of the injuries; predominantly falls from building/structures, ladders or between levels. Falls occurred predominantly in the construction industry (78%). Transport crashes caused 31% of injuries and 24% in heavy vehicles. Half of all the transport injuries occurred ‘off road’. The external cause was coded as ‘non-specific work activity’ in 44.5% of cases; missing in 11.5%. Acute care bed days numbered at 13,302; total cost $19,500,000. High numbers of work-related spinal injuries occurred in the construction industry; particularly falling from a height. Off-road transport-related injuries were significant and likely unaddressed by ‘on-road’ prevention policies. Medical record documentation was insufficient in injury mechanism and context specificity. Workers in the construction industry or those using vehicles off-road were at high risk of spinal injury, suggesting inefficient systems approaches or ineffective prevention policies. Reducing the use of non-specific external cause codes in patients’ medical records would improve the measurement of policy effectiveness. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace injuries; spinal trauma; record-linkage data workplace injuries; spinal trauma; record-linkage data
MDPI and ACS Style

Sharwood, L.N.; Mueller, H.; Ivers, R.Q.; Vaikuntam, B.; Driscoll, T.; Middleton, J.W. The Epidemiology, Cost, and Occupational Context of Spinal Injuries Sustained While ‘Working for Income’ in NSW: A Record-Linkage Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2121.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop