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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010050

Estimating the Excess Mortality Risk during Two Red Alert Periods in Beijing, China

1
Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China
2
Jiangxi Medical School of Nanchang University, No. 461, Nanchang 330006, China
3
Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China
4
Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China
5
Institute of Chronic Non-Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China
6
College for Public Health and Social Justice, Department of Epidemiology & Biostastics, Saint Louis University, Salus Center/Room 473, 3545 Lafayette Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63104, USA
7
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 October 2017 / Revised: 26 December 2017 / Accepted: 28 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
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Abstract

The magnitude of excess mortality risk due to exposures to heavy air pollution during the red alert periods in Beijing remains unknown. A health impact assessment tool combined with the PM2.5-mortality relationship was applied to estimate the number of excess deaths due to high air pollution exposure during two red alert periods in Beijing, China in December 2015. Daily PM2.5 concentration increased from 80.2 µg/m3 to 159.8 µg/m3 during the first red alert period and from 61.9 µg/m3 to 226 µg/m3 during the second period in 2015 when compared to daily PM2.5 concentrations during the same calendar date of 2013 and 2014. It was estimated that 26 to 42 excessive deaths (including 14 to 34 cardiovascular deaths, and four to 16 respiratory deaths) occurred during the first period, and 40 to 65 excessive deaths (22 to 53 cardiovascular deaths, and six to 13 respiratory deaths) occurred during the second period. The results show that heavy smog may have substantially increased the mortality risk in Beijing, suggesting more stringent air pollution controlling measures should be implemented to protect the public health. View Full-Text
Keywords: particulate matter; air pollution; red alert; smog; mortality; Beijing particulate matter; air pollution; red alert; smog; mortality; Beijing
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Zeng, W.; Lang, L.; Li, Y.; Guo, L.; Lin, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, T.; Xiao, J.; Li, X.; Xu, Y.; Xu, X.; Arnold, L.D.; Nelson, E.J.; Qian, Z.; Ma, W. Estimating the Excess Mortality Risk during Two Red Alert Periods in Beijing, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 50.

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