Next Article in Journal
Variations in the Rate of Infestations of Dogs with Zoonotic Nematodes and the Contamination of Soil in Different Environments
Previous Article in Journal
Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Cancer Survivors and Their Family Members: Korea Community Health Survey, 2012
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1002; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091002

Public Health Services Utilization and Its Determinants among Internal Migrants in China: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Survey

1
Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, National Key Laboratory of Health Technology Assessment (National Health and Family Planning Commission), Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China
2
Department of Health Policy and Management, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3
Department of Health Policy and Management, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, 100 Foster Road, Wright Hall, Athens, GA 30602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 July 2017 / Revised: 20 August 2017 / Accepted: 30 August 2017 / Published: 1 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Health Services and Health Economics Research)
Full-Text   |   PDF [5599 KB, uploaded 3 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

There have been obstacles for internal migrants in China in accessing local public health services for some time. This study aimed to estimate the utilization of local public health services and its determinants among internal migrants. Data were from the 2014 and 2015 nationally representative cross-sectional survey of internal migrants in China. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to estimate the relationship between socioeconomic, migration, and demographic characteristics and public health services utilization. Our results showed that internal migrants in more developed eastern regions used less public health services. Those with higher socioeconomic status were more likely to use public health services. The years of living in the city of residence were positively associated with the utilization of public health services. Compared to migration within the city, migration across provinces significantly reduced the probability of using health records (OR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.86–0.90), health education (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94–1.00), and health education on non–communicable diseases (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.89–0.95) or through the Internet (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94–0.99). This study concludes that public health services coverage for internal migrants has seen great improvement due to government subsidies. Internal migrants with lower socioeconomic status and across provinces need to be targeted. More attention should be given to the local government in the developed eastern regions in order to narrow the regional gaps. View Full-Text
Keywords: migrant; public health; health education; health records; China migrant; public health; health education; health records; China
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, J.; Lin, S.; Liang, D.; Qian, Y.; Zhang, D.; Hou, Z. Public Health Services Utilization and Its Determinants among Internal Migrants in China: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1002.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top