Next Article in Journal
Incidence and Consequences of Near-Drowning–Related Pneumonia—A Descriptive Series from Martinique, French West Indies
Next Article in Special Issue
Social and Environmental Influences on Physical Activity Behaviours
Previous Article in Journal
Climate Change and Schools: Environmental Hazards and Resiliency
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Cross-Sectional Investigation of the Importance of Park Features for Promoting Regular Physical Activity in Parks
Open AccessArticle

The Influence of Family Dog Ownership and Parental Perceived Built Environment Measures on Children’s Physical Activity within the Washington, DC Area

1
Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
2
College of Science and Mathematics, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN 37044, USA
3
Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111398
Received: 17 October 2017 / Revised: 10 November 2017 / Accepted: 14 November 2017 / Published: 16 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Environmental Influences on Physical Activity Behaviours)
Sedentary behavior and physical inactivity are significant contributors to youth obesity in the United States. Neighborhood dog walking is an outlet for physical activity (PA). Therefore, understanding the relationship between built environment, dog ownership, and youth PA is essential. This study examined the influence of dog ownership and parental built environment perceptions on children’s PA in the Washington, D.C. area. In 2014, questionnaires were mailed to 2000 parents to assess family dog ownership; children’s outdoor dog walking or playing; and parental perceived built environment measures. Chi-square analyses examined differences in parental perceived built environment measures between children with and without family dogs. The sample included 144 children (50% female; average-age 9.7 years; 56.3% White; 23.7% African-American; 10.4% Asian-American; 29.9% owned dog). Only 13% and 5.6% of the children walked or played outdoors with the dog daily, respectively. A significantly greater proportion (p-value < 0.05) of parents who owned dogs recognized and observed some home built environment measures (e.g., traffic speed on most streets is 30 mph or less) that were PA -promoting for their children. Findings suggest that dog ownership may provide more positive parental perceptions of the neighborhood built environment, which supports children’s outdoor PA through dog walking and playing. View Full-Text
Keywords: dog ownership; physical activity; parental perception; built environment dog ownership; physical activity; parental perception; built environment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Roberts, J.D.; Rodkey, L.; Grisham, C.; Ray, R. The Influence of Family Dog Ownership and Parental Perceived Built Environment Measures on Children’s Physical Activity within the Washington, DC Area. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1398.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop