Next Article in Journal
Socio-Economic and Environmental Factors Associated with Overweight and Obesity in Children Aged 6–8 Years Living in Five Italian Cities (the MAPEC_LIFE Cohort)
Next Article in Special Issue
Protection from Ultraviolet Radiation during Childhood: The Parental Perspective in Bavaria
Previous Article in Journal
Urban Rural Differences in Breast Cancer in New Zealand
Previous Article in Special Issue
Is Multidirectional UV Exposure Responsible for Increasing Melanoma Prevalence with Altitude? A Hypothesis Based on Calculations with a 3D-Human Exposure Model
Comment published on 18 December 2016, see Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(12), 1256.
Review

Sun Exposure and Its Effects on Human Health: Mechanisms through Which Sun Exposure Could Reduce the Risk of Developing Obesity and Cardiometabolic Dysfunction

Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, P.O. Box 855, Perth 6872, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Daniela Haluza, Stana Simic and Hanns Moshammer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(10), 999; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13100999
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 30 September 2016 / Accepted: 1 October 2016 / Published: 11 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue UV-Radiation: From Physics to Impacts)
Obesity is a significant burden on global healthcare due to its high prevalence and associations with chronic health conditions. In our animal studies, ongoing exposure to low dose ultraviolet radiation (UVR, found in sunlight) reduced weight gain and the development of signs of cardiometabolic dysfunction in mice fed a high fat diet. These observations suggest that regular exposure to safe levels of sunlight could be an effective means of reducing the burden of obesity. However, there is limited knowledge around the nature of associations between sun exposure and the development of obesity and cardiometabolic dysfunction, and we do not know if sun exposure (independent of outdoor activity) affects the metabolic processes that determine obesity in humans. In addition, excessive sun exposure has strong associations with a number of negative health consequences such as skin cancer. This means it is very important to “get the balance right” to ensure that we receive benefits without increasing harm. In this review, we detail the evidence around the cardiometabolic protective effects of UVR and suggest mechanistic pathways through which UVR could be beneficial. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; ultraviolet radiation; type-2 diabetes; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease obesity; ultraviolet radiation; type-2 diabetes; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Fleury, N.; Geldenhuys, S.; Gorman, S. Sun Exposure and Its Effects on Human Health: Mechanisms through Which Sun Exposure Could Reduce the Risk of Developing Obesity and Cardiometabolic Dysfunction. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 999. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13100999

AMA Style

Fleury N, Geldenhuys S, Gorman S. Sun Exposure and Its Effects on Human Health: Mechanisms through Which Sun Exposure Could Reduce the Risk of Developing Obesity and Cardiometabolic Dysfunction. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2016; 13(10):999. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13100999

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fleury, Naomi, Sian Geldenhuys, and Shelley Gorman. 2016. "Sun Exposure and Its Effects on Human Health: Mechanisms through Which Sun Exposure Could Reduce the Risk of Developing Obesity and Cardiometabolic Dysfunction" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13, no. 10: 999. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13100999

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop