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Open AccessArticle

First Trimester Phthalate Exposure and Infant Birth Weight in the Infant Development and Environment Study

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Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, 2001 W. 8th Ave, Seattle, WA 98121, USA
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Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, 2001 W. 8th Ave, Seattle, WA 98121, USA
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Seattle Children’s Research Institute, University of Washington, 2001 W. 8th Ave, Seattle, WA 98121, USA
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Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
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Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA
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Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Preventive Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Margot Van de Bor and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(10), 945; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13100945
Received: 2 June 2016 / Revised: 24 August 2016 / Accepted: 15 September 2016 / Published: 23 September 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Early exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals)
Phthalate exposure is widespread among pregnant women but whether it is related to fetal growth and birth weight remains to be determined. We examined whether first trimester prenatal phthalate exposure was associated with birth weight in a pregnancy cohort study. We recruited first trimester pregnant women from 2010–2012 from four centers and analyzed mother/infant dyads who had complete urinary phthalate and birth record data (N = 753). We conducted multiple linear regression to examine if prenatal log specific gravity adjusted urinary phthalate exposure was related to birthweight in term and preterm (≤37 weeks) infants, stratified by sex. We observed a significant association between mono carboxy-isononyl phthalate (MCOP) exposure and increased birthweight in term males, 0.13 kg (95% CI 0.03, 0.23). In preterm infants, we observed a 0.49 kg (95% CI 0.09, 0.89) increase in birthweight in relation to a one log unit change in the sum of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolite concentrations in females (N = 33). In summary, we observed few associations between prenatal phthalate exposure and birthweight. Positive associations may be attributable to unresolved confounding in term infants and limited sample size in preterm infants. View Full-Text
Keywords: birth weight; phthalate; preterm; fetal growth; first trimester birth weight; phthalate; preterm; fetal growth; first trimester
MDPI and ACS Style

Sathyanarayana, S.; Barrett, E.; Nguyen, R.; Redmon, B.; Haaland, W.; Swan, S.H. First Trimester Phthalate Exposure and Infant Birth Weight in the Infant Development and Environment Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 945.

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