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Open AccessArticle

Development of a Quantitative Methodology to Assess the Impacts of Urban Transport Interventions and Related Noise on Well-Being

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European Centre for Environment and Health, World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe, Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1, 53113 Bonn, Germany
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Federal Environment Agency, Section II 1.6 Exposure Assessment and Environmental Health Indicators, 14195 Berlin, Germany
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School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Road, Bristol BS8 1SS, UK
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Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Environmental Engineering Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
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Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Socinstr. 57, 4002 Basel, Switzerland
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University of Basel, Peterspl. 1, 4003 Basel, Switzerland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Lercher
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 5792-5814; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph120605792
Received: 30 January 2015 / Revised: 7 May 2015 / Accepted: 15 May 2015 / Published: 26 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sound and Health related Quality of Life)
Well-being impact assessments of urban interventions are a difficult challenge, as there is no agreed methodology and scarce evidence on the relationship between environmental conditions and well-being. The European Union (EU) project “Urban Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China and Europe” (URGENCHE) explored a methodological approach to assess traffic noise-related well-being impacts of transport interventions in three European cities (Basel, Rotterdam and Thessaloniki) linking modeled traffic noise reduction effects with survey data indicating noise-well-being associations. Local noise models showed a reduction of high traffic noise levels in all cities as a result of different urban interventions. Survey data indicated that perception of high noise levels was associated with lower probability of well-being. Connecting the local noise exposure profiles with the noise-well-being associations suggests that the urban transport interventions may have a marginal but positive effect on population well-being. This paper also provides insight into the methodological challenges of well-being assessments and highlights the range of limitations arising from the current lack of reliable evidence on environmental conditions and well-being. Due to these limitations, the results should be interpreted with caution. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban policies; climate change; mitigation; greenhouse gas; transport; noise; well-being; impact assessment urban policies; climate change; mitigation; greenhouse gas; transport; noise; well-being; impact assessment
MDPI and ACS Style

Braubach, M.; Tobollik, M.; Mudu, P.; Hiscock, R.; Chapizanis, D.; Sarigiannis, D.A.; Keuken, M.; Perez, L.; Martuzzi, M. Development of a Quantitative Methodology to Assess the Impacts of Urban Transport Interventions and Related Noise on Well-Being. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5792-5814.

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