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Evaluation of Respirable Crystalline Silica in High School Ceramics Classrooms

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Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA
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Division of Environmental Health, Salt Lake County Health Department, Murray, UT 84107, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(2), 1250-1260; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph110201250
Received: 29 October 2013 / Revised: 10 January 2014 / Accepted: 10 January 2014 / Published: 23 January 2014
Air concentrations of respirable crystalline silica were measured in eleven (11) high school ceramics classrooms located in Salt Lake County, UT, USA. Respirable dust was collected on PVC filters using precision flow pumps and cyclone samplers (n = 44). Filters were subsequently analyzed for respirable dust and percent crystalline silica content. The geometric mean of the silica concentrations was 0.009 mg/m3 near the teacher’s work station and 0.008 mg/m3 near the kilns. The number of students in the classroom was correlated to the silica concentration in the ceramics classroom, but no correlation was found between the silica concentrations and either the size of the classroom or the age of the building. Results from this study indicate that ceramics teachers may be at an increased risk of exposure to crystalline silica based on the ACGIH TLV of 0.025 mg/m3, with an exceedance of 21%. View Full-Text
Keywords: crystalline silica; respirable dust; particulate matter; ceramics; pottery; teachers; schools crystalline silica; respirable dust; particulate matter; ceramics; pottery; teachers; schools
MDPI and ACS Style

Fechser, M.; Alaves, V.; Larson, R.; Sleeth, D. Evaluation of Respirable Crystalline Silica in High School Ceramics Classrooms. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 1250-1260.

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